‘Why do I have to fight to find my mother?’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 23, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

‘Why do I have to fight to find my mother?’

The clinical psychologist had come to Mumbai from Netherlands for the hearing on Friday hoping she would be able to get some information on her biological parents, but the high court dismissed her petition.

mumbai Updated: Oct 23, 2010 01:08 IST
HT Correspondent

She seemed tired but determined.

When the Hindustan Times caught up with 34-year-old Daksha Dijck at her lawyer’s office in south Mumbai on Friday, she made a request. “Please publish my photograph,” she said. “Maybe my mother will see it and contact me.”

The clinical psychologist had come to Mumbai from Netherlands for the hearing on Friday hoping she would be able to get some information on her biological parents, but the high court dismissed her petition.

Dijck, who was adopted by a Dutch couple in 1975, first visited India with her scientist husband in 2001. After returning to Netherlands, she tried to trace her biological parents through Wereldkinderen, the Netherlands-based adoption agency that had coordinated her adoption with its Indian counterpart.

When these attempts failed, Dijck approached the Bombay High Court and filed a petition saying she suspected she was kidnapped and put up for international adoption.

“Abroad we have interviews of biological parents after they have met their children who were given up for adoption,” Dijck said.

“The parents are so happy to see their children, especially if the children are doing well in life. I don’t see why Indian mothers would be different.”

For Dijck, the hearing came with its challenges, the toughest one being leaving her nine-month-old daughter, Nanak, behind in Netherlands whenever she travelled to India to appear in court.

“When I left for India, she was suffering from fever. It was so hard for me leave her back there,” Dijck said. “But I so wanted Nanak to know her grandmother.”

Despite Friday’s setback, Dijck said she was not going to give up the search for her biological mother. “I don’t understand why I have to fight to find my mother,” she said. “It is my right and I will continue to look for her.”