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Bhula Do boys are back

Pakistani band Raeth, best remembered for its track Bhula Do, is back with its latest album — Hum Yaadon Ke Sang. A balanced use of powerful vocals and the somewhat loud electric guitar makes the songs in this album stand out.

music Updated: Jul 30, 2010 01:01 IST
Himadree

Pakistani band Raeth, best remembered for its track Bhula Do, is back with its latest album — Hum Yaadon Ke Sang. A balanced use of powerful vocals and the somewhat loud electric guitar makes the songs in this album stand out.



While talking to HT City from Karachi, lead guitarist Hassan Farabi, 19, sounded ecstatic. "We shot our first video in Mumbai and had always wanted to go back. If visa details are sorted soon, we will back in Mumbai to shoot our title track."



Talking about their three-year hiatus, Farabi said, "It took us a year in the studio and another to put it together." Asked how they feel about their latest sound, vocalist Wajhi Faraouqui, 21, said, "It’s a new-age style of music."



The opening track, Hum Yadoon Ke Sang, is purely a romantic rock number. The beginning is abrupt, with just 15 seconds of music before the vocals hit you hard. Two other versions of this song — the acoustic and the club mix — add variety. The acoustic version actually sounds better than the original.



raethWaada is a touching melody in a slow tempo and with soft vocals. Without a doubt, you’ll be reminded of Atif Aslam when you listen to it. The club mix version is peppy.

You feel as if words are suddenly being thrown at you, with abrupt breaks, when you start playing Mein Chala, the third track. On the whole, this one is a very light-hearted song with crisp vocals and soft music.

Tum Meri Ho takes off on a slow pace and the song kind of grows on you. With a very hummable tune, romantic lyrics and a subdued instrumental chorus, this is one of the best among the 11 tracks.

Don’t go by the lyrics Bolo Toh; it’s straight out of the Bolly-kit and sounds more like a disco-beat of Bappi Lahiri. With Jhoothi Kahani, you’ll have to strain your ears to get the lyrics right. Jarring drum beats and loud guitar dominate the screaming vocals. The lyrical experimentation of the views by a flirtatious man is great, but the touch-and-go classical aalap in one or two sentences doesn’t make it outstanding.

Aag, the seventh track, has catchy lyrics. The cello and violin blend beautifully with the vocals. Dil Nahin Manta is worth applauding. Initially, the song is hung on Lucky Ali-like music. Not much of a rock tune, but the rhythm is just right without a heavy dose of electric guitar.

Overall, with its raw but fresh sound, Raeth seems here to stay.

The album is priced at 150.