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Big fix for indie city bands

Indie music gets push with initiative Day 1 by international record label, to organise monthly gig at Mehboob studio promoting new artistes, bands.

music Updated: Aug 02, 2011 14:06 IST
Nikhil Hemrajani

Last month, a group of 300 to 350 people diligently assembled at the Vintage Recording Studio in Mehboob Studios, Bandra, to listen to city outfits Alex Rintu, The Mavyns and Colour Compound. The event on July 16, titled Live From The Console, was promoted entirely by word of mouth and through social networking website Facebook, starting just a week prior to the show.

Even as the music listeners paid for their Rs 150 entry and collected their one-day liquor permits, they didn’t know who the gig’s organisers were. As it turns out, Sony Music and event management company Oranjuice Entertainment — known for organising the Mahindra Blues and One Tree music festivals — are the guys behind it.

The next edition on August 13 will see electronic acts Medusa, Tempo Tantrick and singer-songwriter Siddharth Basrur, who fronts Mumbai-based bands Goddess Gagged, Bones For Bertie and The Venus Project.

Sony Music’s initiative Day 1 comprises two labels, Folktronic and Zomba, for promoting the folk and hip-hop genres in India respectively. Jayesh Veralkar, label head for Day 1 mentions, “The whole idea (behind the gigs) was to setup an alternate venue, not a pub or a bar, but a place where people could come just for the music. We also want to give newer indie acts — as opposed to established bands — a platform to showcase their talent.” Jayesh also emphasises that Sony’s ready to go all the way, including signing up bands and releasing compilation albums later down the line.

Why hold the event in the smallish Vintage Recording Studio? “Undoubtedly, this place has the best acoustics in the city,” says Oranjuice’s director Owen Roncon. “This is where Asha Bhosle and Mohammed Rafi recorded their music back in the ’50s and ’60s with live orchestration,” he adds. The venue’s capacity of just 400 people doesn’t leave him apprehensive either. “We want to keep the event on the ground and have people come in just for the music — not for the food, ambience and whatnot,” he adds.

Next event on August 13, 9 pm onwards a Mehboob Studios. Visit www.facebook.com/livefromtheconsole for info