Ghazals go groovy | music | Hindustan Times
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Ghazals go groovy

Indian classical bandish and folk tunes have always been the subject of interest for musicians looking to experiment with genres. However, ghazals, a style as significant to our music milieu as the former two, have never really been considered fusion-friendly.

music Updated: Aug 14, 2013 17:47 IST
Nirmika Singh

Indian classical bandish and folk tunes have always been the subject of interest for musicians looking to experiment with genres. However, ghazals, a style as significant to our music milieu as the former two, have never really been considered fusion-friendly.

But with her newest project, singer Shruti Pathak plans to change things. As part of her new band, called Guzzler, she will be revisiting popular ghazals and adding her own twist to them at her gig in the city tonight (August 14). “I grew up listening to ghazals of Mehdi Hasan, Ghulam Ali and Jagjit Singh, and really wanted to experiment with them. With this band, we’ve modernised the genre, so that it appeals to the youth as well,” says Pathak, who will mix pop, rock and funk with her favourite ghazals. Some of these include, Ranjish hi sahi (Mehdi Hasan), Kaash (Hariharan) and Aye khuda (Jagjit Singh).

Besides her, Guzzler comprises Beven Fonseca (keyboard), Vinayak Pol (drums), Papl (bass), Cajetan D’souza (guitar), Sabir Khan (sarangi) and Vaibhav Wavikar (percussions).

Given that ghazals by renowned artistes are revered for their lyrical genius, Pathak says it was a challenging task to ensure that their purity was not diluted. She says, “It is a beautiful form of music. We are revisiting them in such a way that their authenticity doesn’t go away with the western instrumentation. We are doing this with a lot of passion and hope that ghazal listeners will like it.”