Holi: Have you included these songs in your playlist?

  • Soumya Vajpayee Tiwari, A Sarwar Borah, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
  • Updated: Mar 05, 2015 21:51 IST

Have you decided your final playlist for Holi yet. Well, don't worry, we're here to help you with our amazing playlist.

Balam pichkari — Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani (2013)

Apart from singers Vishal Dadlani and Shalmali Kholgade’s energetic rendition, it works because of its rhythm and foot-tapping beats.

Chhan ke mohalla — Action Replayy (2010)

While Aishwarya Rai Bachchan’s dance moves added zing to the Holi celebrations in this colourful song, Sunidhi Chauhan’s powerful voice is what really makes it memorable.

Do me a favour — Waqt (2005)

This Anu Malik track instantly clicked with listeners because of its energy.

Holi re — Mangal Pandey (2005)

This track has been sung by Udit Narayan, Madhushree, Srinivas and Chinmaye. Aamir Khan has also recorded a few lines.

Holi khele Raghuveera — Baghban (2003)

Picturised on Amitabh Bachchan and Hema Malini, the folk elements of this song make it an apt one for traditional Holi celebrations.

Ang se ang — Darr (1993)

The track has been part of all hit Holi playlists ever since the film released.

Soni soni — Mohabbatein (2000)

Though this song is 15 years old, it still strikes a chord during the festival of colours. The melody of the song is catchy. Shah Rukh Khan, undoubtedly, provides the energy and Holi spirit to the number.

Rang barse — Silsila (1981)

Safe to say, this song is almost like an anthem for Holi. Written by Harivansh Rai Bachchan and sung by his son, Amitabh Bachchan, Rang barse is still the most-played song during Holi.

Holi ke din — Sholay (1975)

This foot-tapping number is one of the most popular Bollywood Holi songs of all time. It has been a regular on the Holi playlist for years.

Aaj na chodenge – Kati Patang (1970)

Kishore Kumar’s energetic singing, coupled with Rajesh Khanna’s subtle dance movements, makes this song an all time favourite.

You can also celebrate Holi to the tunes of qawwali

Several Sufi couplets, written over the ages, echo the joy and the zest of the festival of colours. Also add them to your Holi playlist this year.

Tuning into iconic Bollywood numbers such as Rang Barse and Hori Khele Raghuveera, to usher in the zeal of Holi has become as much a ritual for many of us, as the festival itself. However, for those looking to add a different musical twist to their Holi celebrations this year, addding some qawwalis to the playlist may be a fresh idea. In fact, several musical programmes, centered around Holi qawwalis are being organised in the city (see box).

Since time immemorial, several qawwalis have been penned qawwalis that speak of a mystical Holi between the Almighty and his worshipper. In fact, colour has been used as a metaphor by the Sufi saints in their kalams to express their profound love for the Almighty. Hazrat Amir Khusro, a disciple of Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya, is credited for introducing qawwali as a medium to connect with the Almighty, and one of his famous kalams, Aaj Rang Hai Ai Maan, Aaj Rang Hai Rii, in honour of his mentor speaks of colour and joy. “In Sufism words have much deeper meanings, and a lot depends on how one conveys it,” says Nasir Hussain Sabri, a qawal from Bhopal.

Another couplet by Khusro on Holi says, Chal Re Sakhi Holi Khelenge, Khwaja Piya Ke Sang, Jeet Gayi Toh Khwaja Milenge, Hari Toh Sang. Syed Rumman Nizami, a descendant of Hazrat Nizamuddin, says that Khusro’s writings can be divided into four parts — divani (collection of poems), masnavi (poetic form), chutkule paheliyan (phrases and idioms) and qawwali.

Saqlain Nizami, a qawal at Nizamuddin dargah, whose father Ustad Mirza Ahmed Nizami is credited for including Kabir’s dohe and Meera’s bhajan in qawwali, recites another famous kalam on Holi — Shyam Sunder Toh Se Khelungi Holi, Saans Nanad Poche Kaha Laga Itni Der, Khelungi So Holi, So Holi Piya Ki.

Qawwalis celebrating Holi have been used in films as well. Mera Murshid Khele Holi, a song penned by Niranjan Iyengar in the film D Day, is such a song. "In the song, I refer to emotions as colours and how God is playing with them," says Niranjan.

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