How Mithoon brings 'touch of melancholy' amid upbeat sound

  • Ruchika Kher, Hindustan Times, Mumbai
  • Updated: May 23, 2015 18:53 IST

After breaking into Bollywood with songs like

Woh lamhe

(Zeher; 2005) and Bas ek pal (Bas Ek Pal; 2006), Mithoon received tremendous acclaim when he composed Tum hi ho (Aashiqui 2; 2013).

Soon, he became the flavour of the season with back-to-back hits. Even then, the artiste continued to stay out of the public glare. “I am an introvert, and not really a people’s person,” he nonchalantly says, before adding, “Your work also plays an important role in the kind of person you become. When I work, I need to go into a shell to focus fully on my music; I need that silence. I don’t go for social gatherings. In fact, in this process, I have lost out on a lot of my good friends. But when I see people appreciating my music, it all seems worth it.”

At a time when most composers depend on a more upbeat sound for their songs, the 30-year-old musician still relies on a touch of melancholy. “My music is a reflection of my thoughts. Most of my songs reflect on the emotion that humans are weak, and vulnerable beings. My songs are a tribute to human emotions and relationships, that’s where they get their lilting quality,” says Mithoon, who initially wanted to become a concert pianist, but gave up the idea while pursuing his Bollywood dream.

“There’s no better platform than Bollywood to show people your talent or to express your creativity than. It has such a wide reach,” he says. However, making it big has not been a cakewalk for him. “No journey is easy. Everyone puts their blood and sweat into achieving what they want to. Every journey has challenges, but that’s exactly what makes it beautiful. While it has been hard, I thoroughly enjoyed it,” he says.

When we quizzed the composer—who is awaiting the release of his next, starring

Vidya Balan


Emraan Hashmi

— about the growing competition in the industry, Mithoon seemed unperturbed.

“I don’t feel there is any competition. In fact, the concept of competition is senseless. Everyone has their respective space here. I’m a secure person because I know that I have the freedom to do what I like,” he says, adding that the only thing that makes him jittery is the expectation of the audience. “That does put pressure. But that’s my motivation to do well. When I see people enjoying my music, I feel satisfied,” he says.

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