I'm like a river: Kailash Kher | music | Hindustan Times
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I'm like a river: Kailash Kher

His is the powerful voice behind Allah Ke Bande, and Kailash Kher seems to echo the same fervour when he says he experiences "heavenly bliss" when he sings.

music Updated: Jun 21, 2007 17:50 IST
Kailash Kher

His is the powerful voice behind the uplifting Allah Ke Bande, and Kailash Kher seems to echo the fervour in the song when he says he experiences "heavenly bliss" whenever he sings.

The diminutive singer -- a Delhiite who came to Mumbai in search of career and fortune and lived in the Andheri railway station during his struggling days -- has taken the industry by storm with a slew of hits both as a playback singer and as an album artiste.

Kher, whose Sufi songs have made him instantly recognisable, says the names of his two albums say it all - Kailasa and Kailasa Jhoomo Re.

"Kailasa means heaven and I experience heavenly bliss through my songs. I feel the music within myself," Kher told IANS.

The current singing sensation of Bollywood shot to fame with back-to-back hits Allah Ke Bande from Waisa Bhi Hota Hai II and O Sikander from Corporate.

Kher has produced some of the biggest musical hits of recent time, like Teri Deewani from Kailasa, Chak De Phatte from the hit 2006 film Khosla Ka Ghosla. Songs from his second album Kailasa Jhoomo Re are on high rotation on radio stations and television channels.

The popular but humble singer says he is not consciously trying to lie low in an industry in which a newcomer grabbing the limelight can cause some flutter among the biggies.

"I'm naturally like this," he said. "I'm like the river that keeps on flowing without worrying whether the banks are clean or dirty. I love staying with my music. That's my nature."

The versatile Kher, who also does a lot of international stage shows, adds that Indian music is slowly gaining global recognition.

"Today there is a lot of exposure for Indian singers. The world is becoming a global village and I can see more and more people appreciating our music."