It’s fertile time for independent music in India: Uday Benegal

  • Kaushani Banerjee, Hindustan Times, Mumbai
  • Updated: Feb 12, 2016 17:34 IST
Uday Benegal is the lead singer of the 30-year old rock band, Indus Creed. (UdayBenegalOfficial/Facebook)

Popular rock group, Indus Creed, will perform at Mumbai’s Ballard Estate Festival, powered by Hindustan Times, on Saturday (February 13). Ahead of the performance, the 30-year-old outfit’s frontman, Uday Benegal, talks to us about the group’s evolution, and more.

You started out in 1985. How has your music changed over the years?

Our songs speak for the change that has taken place. Music is a reflection of yourself. So, any change that happens within you is reflected in your music as well. It is difficult for me to say how exactly we have changed; but I feel our music speaks for us.

Watch Pretty Child by Indus Creed here:

How has the band evolved?

There are three distinct periods we went through. In our earliest avatar, as Rock Machine, we were a pretty straight-up college-style rock band. Then, at one point, we started to experiment with Indian instrumentation. After we disbanded, I moved to New York, USA, where I lived for nine years. When I moved back, we started the band once again after 17 years. There was a change in the line-up; three of us in the current band are original members. The two younger musicians are the ones we met recently. As musicians, there are elements that remain the same in terms of a band’s melodic content. But, we have all experienced life differently, so, a lot of it became a reflection of our personal experiences.

Read: Indus Creed returns with a new album

Watch Fireflies by Indus Creed here:

Had the music scene changed when you came back?

The most significant change in the current scenario is that it has all become about original music. That was a bias we had to fight when we started out. But now, every band is expected to play its own material, which is the best thing that has happened to independent music in this country. This is a very fertile time.

As a rock band that started in the ‘80s, what does it take to stay relevant?

Relevance is a tricky word for any artiste, especially when there’s been a certain amount of longevity in your career. It’s the kind of thing that can bring you down or keep you going. If you start to fear that you’re becoming irrelevant, then you will try to become someone else. But if you be yourself, you will always be relevant.

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