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Music Review: Dabangg

Keeping in mind the film that is set in a small town in Uttar Pradesh, composer duo Sajid-Wajid have composed a soundtrack for Dabangg that has mass appeal and is entertaining.

music Updated: Aug 09, 2010 20:01 IST

Dabangg
Music Directors: Sajid-Wajid and Lalit Pandit
Lyricists: Faiz Anwar, Lalit Pandit and Jalees Sherwani
Singers: Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Mamta Sharma, Aishwarya, Sonu Niigaam, Shreya Ghoshal, Sukhwinder Singh, Wajid, Master Saleem, Shabaab Sabri and Salman Khan
Rating: ***

Keeping in mind the film that is set in a small town in Uttar Pradesh, composer duo Sajid-Wajid have composed a soundtrack for Dabangg that has mass appeal and is entertaining.

The album offers 10 tracks.

The soundtrack of the much-awaited Salman Khan flick opens with Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, a favourite of Sajid-Wajid, crooning romantic track Tere mast mast do nain. The moderately paced track is likeable especially due to the brilliant vocals, and the change in tempo gives an edge to the track. This is a song you would like to hear.

The number has two more versions - one a duet with Shreya Ghoshal and the other a remix.

Then the album takes a turn and brings forward a completely different song Munni badnaam, composed by Lalit Pandit and sung by Mamta Sharma and Aishwarya. The item number goes well with the character of the film. It is fast-paced and catchy.

This song too has a remixed version attached to it.

Romance again creeps in the soundtrack with Sonu Niigaam and Shreya Ghoshal behind the mike for Chori kiya re jiya. The song is a soft and melodious love ballad. Even though the composition doesn't offer too much experimentation, the song exudes a pleasing effect.

Next is the title track of the film, which has a faint resemblance to the title track of the film Omkara. Yet, it is hard-hitting and appeals to the listener. The song crooned by Sukhwinder Singh and composer Wajid himself, describes Salman's character in the film.

Then there is Humka peena hai, a song soaked in the folk flavour. Vocals by Wajid, Master Saleem and Shabaab Sabri, this dance number is meant for the masses and has dholak as the predominant instrument. This has a remixed version too.

Finally, there is the theme song of the film that is packed with dialogues by Salman.

On the whole, the soundtrack of the film is entertaining and apt for the film.