Rahman's Lord of the Rings music goes missing | music | Hindustan Times
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Rahman's Lord of the Rings music goes missing

music Updated: Jun 20, 2007 13:02 IST
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A laptop containing new compositions of popular Indian music composer went missing when he arrived to London on Monday night for the theatrical version of Lord of the Rings scheduled for June 19, 2007.

Rahman arrived at the Heathrow airport from Washington after a successful performance in the US, but was stunned to discover that one of two bags checked in were missing. The missing bag contains his laptop as well as designer clothes.

He said as he frantically called British Airways to inquire about his missing baggage: "I don't know what to feel, I don't know what to say. I am very confused. I am disturbed. I have lost my laptop containing the whole data of my work and music."

He added that the laptop contained his new compositions as well. He was supposed to wear the designer clothes for the Lord of the Rings musical.

A spokesman of British Airways told IANS that Rahman should contact the airline with his details. "After he contacts us, we will do everything possible in our power to get the missing bag back."

The West End production of The Lord of the Rings is scheduled to open on Tuesday evening at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, in Covent Garden.

<b1>Based on the hugely popular trilogy of novels by JRR Tolkien, it features direction by Matthew Warchus, book and lyrics by Shaun McKenna and Matthew Warchus, and music by Rahman and Värttinä with Christopher Nightingdale

Parvez Alam, editor of India-EU Film Initiative, told IANS that Lord of the Rings is the most expensive musical ever staged outside Las Vegas, and the first major stage adaptation of Tolkien's classic trilogy.

Rahman's music in collaboration with Värttinä, exhilarating choreography, remarkable staging and stunning design will combine to transform Drury Lane into Tolkien's Middle-earth in a mesmerising and spectacular theatrical event featuring an ensemble of over 70 actors, singers and musicians.

Alam said that this was the second musical by Rahman after the success of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Bollywood Dreams.

Reports say that the adaptation was savaged by many critics when it opened in Toronto last year. Cut and substantially rewritten, it has cost 25 million pounds to bring it to London, making it the most expensive musical ever staged outside Las Vegas.

According to reports, the new version was applauded by the audience at a preview in London.

This follows the 70th anniversary of Tolkien starting to write the trilogy and the 50th anniversary of the publication of the complete trilogy, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King.