The producers did not promote the music of Bombay Velvet: Amit Trivedi | music | Hindustan Times
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The producers did not promote the music of Bombay Velvet: Amit Trivedi

Music composer Amit Trivedi cites that as a reason for the music of the film not doing well.

music Updated: May 06, 2016 07:48 IST
Samarth Goyal
Trivedi, who “gave his all” to the compositions, blames the makers of the film for not promoting it enough.
Trivedi, who “gave his all” to the compositions, blames the makers of the film for not promoting it enough.

He has composed many hit songs for Bollywood films such as Dev. D (2009), Lootera (2013) and Shandaar (2015). But it’s the music of Bombay Velvet (2015) that remains the closest to composer Amit Trivedi’s heart, despite it not becoming too popular.

The Ranbir Kapoor and Anushka Sharma-starrer didn’t fare well at the box office, and the music too didn’t make an impact. Trivedi, who “gave his all” to the compositions, blames the makers of the film for not promoting it enough.

Amit Trivedi wishes that producers understand that a “great amount of effort” goes into creating scores.

“Music for that film is something I will cherish for the rest of my life. When the time came, to promote the music for the film, the producers decided to play it safe, and they didn’t release the original music, they chose to release the remixes instead.I think that’s where the music failed to reach out to people,” says the 37-year-old.

Read: Things are getting better for independent musicians: Amit Trivedi

“For the first month before the film released, they (the makers) did not play any original music thinking it was too jazz to be liked by people,” adds Trivedi, who believes that the film’s negative reviews affected its music as well. “The film released on a Friday and was out of the theatres by Saturday. So essentially, we had only one day to showcase the original music,” he says.

Trivedi only wishes that producers understand that a “great amount of effort” goes into creating scores. “Bringing jazz to mainstream was pretty difficult and I would have just wanted people to recognize the Herculean effort that went behind it,” he says.