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Those Golden days: remembering Vijay 'Goldie' Anand

Raju Bharatan writes about Goldie Vijay Anand who influenced a whole generation of filmmakers as a writer director, on his fourth death anniversary.

music Updated: Feb 26, 2008 12:20 IST
Raju Bharatan

The Saturday gone by was the fourth death anniversary of Goldie Vijay Anand - a cineaste influencing a whole generation of filmmakers as a writer director ahead of his time.

Why did Goldie also fade away ahead of his time? "Unlike with even Kalyanji Anandji," explained Goldie, "I found I had to wait in a queue for my Rajput music session with Laxmikant-Pyarelal."

"Habitually," continued Goldie, "I made my music at a leisured sitting with Dada Burman. "Goldie ko gaana pasand nahein aaya," Dada'd tell wife Meera later if I failed to respond to his six tunes for the situation outlined."

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"That'd make Dada," added Goldie, "do six more tunes inside the week during which I'd be back. True, even on Dada Burman I couldn't barge in if he was working on, say, a Pramod Chakrabarty film. Dada would then tongue-lash me for disturbing him!"

"But two-three days later," reminisced Goldie, "Dada'd himself call. After that, all of Dada's time was mine. It was in such an ambient setting that Guide tunes like Kaaton se kheench ke yeh aanchal took shape."

It'll shock readers to know how negative a view Goldie had on Waheeda Rehman as an actress.

"Waheeda was so full of typical Indian reserve I had a problem getting her to feel totally carefree while bursting into Kaaton se. Repeatedly I had to emphasise to Waheeda how I needed her to shed all inhibition for her to take off with Dev, astride that truck, with Kaaton se."

"No less tough to draw out," added Goldie, "was Waheeda in those Guide ensembles of Saiyyan beimaan and Piyaa tose - even after I'd myself danced it out for her. Waheeda was a wonderful dancer. But getting her to break free from her cloistered upbringing wasn't easy underlined Goldie."

We cinegoers view Waheeda otherwise, re-playing - on our mental screen - Piyaa tose, Saiyyan beimaan and Kaaton se. But that's the genius of Goldie - that he could ultimately so bring off Piyaa tose, Saiyyan beimaan and Kaaton se on a Waheeda refusing to open out."

"If Waheeda proved such a tough nut," I remarked, "how did you crack the Ayyangar Brahmin tradition-bound Hema Malini?"

"Oh Hema, with her talking eyes, was one up on every other heroine I handled," noted Goldie.

"Perhaps because she regularly danced off-screen too, Hema could evoke any mood I wanted in a trice." Babul number "Take O baabul pyaare in Johny Mera Naam," observed Goldie. "For Kishore's Nafrat karne walon ke on Dev, I'd turned to Kalyanji. But, to tune something like O babul pyaare for Lata-Hema, I knew it had to be Anandji."

"Hema was superb, the way she gave expression to O babul pyaare in the precise shades I sought. I don't think I could've got Waheeda to do it the vivid way Hema executed O baabul pyaare."

That's Goldie, startlingly offbeat in his assessments.