What’s your hit formula? | music | Hindustan Times
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What’s your hit formula?

Spending a fortune for a film song has been a Bollywood fad. Continuing with the trend, in Anees Bazmee’s Ready, starring Salman Khan and Asin, every song sequence is touted to be an extravaganza. Bhushan Kumar, the producer, has spent more than Rs 2.5 crore on what he calls, “a complete family item song”.

music Updated: Dec 20, 2010 01:30 IST
Salman Khan

Spending a fortune for a film song has been a Bollywood fad. Continuing with the trend, in Anees Bazmee’s Ready, starring Salman Khan and Asin, every song sequence is touted to be an extravaganza. Bhushan Kumar, the producer, has spent more than Rs 2.5 crore on what he calls, “a complete family item song”.

“The song Peeche Peeche features the entire family celebrating the marriage of the lead characters, played by Salman bhai and Asin,” Kumar says.

Ironically, the most popular song of today — Sheila Ki jawani — was shot for a pittance. “Sheila… is the most successful song of my career and was shot at a budget of Rs 20 laks,” says director Farah Khan. “We didn’t even build a set. There were various props like rotating bed, candle and mirrors that were used on a 20 feet stage in an empty studio.”

For Peeche Peeche, art director Rajat Podar started working on the set at Film City, Goregaon, Mumbai, last month and it took choreographers Chinni Prakash and Mudassar six days to shoot the song. Apart from the actors and 100 dancers, about 100 more extras were featured.

But these figures may not guarantee success. “If you have 200 dancers doing terrible dance on an elaborate set, it may not be a hit,” says Khan. “I feel that lack of creativity is sometimes being substituted with elaborate sets and expensive songs.” However, Taran Adarsh, trade analyst, says, “Bhushan Kumar likes to spend huge amounts on the songs of his movies. It is a great way to lure audience.”

“Producers shell out a fortune hoping to make a profit by the song’s popularity,” says Sameer Chanda, art director, who designed sets for films such as Raavan and Aks. “But it’s more of a gimmick.”