Crisis in AAP leaves us with more questions than answers

AAP could face more such unpleasantness in future if it fails to tackle uncomfortable issues.

Plugging the leaks: PM must create a robust subsidy management system

The PM has asked the rich to give up gas subsidy. He must now create a robust subsidy management system
If the UNSC expands, India will not be the sole new member. It has a better chance if it is part of a ‘package’.
The no detention policy is being held responsible for the falling learning levels. But failing students cannot ensure learning, writes Disha Nawani.
The pictures this month of young men clinging like leeches to the wall of an examination centre in Bihar, feeding answers to examinees, symbolised a dilemma of Indian governance — the problem of matching plans and policies with ground realities. All was well on paper. The carefully planned schedule of exams took place, but the reality was that they were a fiasco.
“Someone told me you can help,” she said. “Please, we are desperate.”
The Supreme Court judgment declaring Section 66A of the Information Technology Act as unconstitutional has been hailed in India.
Competitive, colourful and sometimes even controversial: There is something about an Australia vs India contest in cricket. On the eve of what will undoubtedly be a thrilling world cup semi-final, two nations prepare themselves for what we all hope will be a match of the ages.
The political narrative in Kashmir is changing but the backbone position remains unchanged: The issue needs to be solved peacefully. The level of protests in the Valley has come down not because of any credible political process but due to the harsh winters and the devastating floods in September last year.
The European Union-India strategic partnership needs a new impulse. Partnering with India on its urban development agenda by tapping into the ‘Make in India’ project and launching an EU-India urbanisation forum would contribute to revive an unresponsive partnership.
What ails our police force? Principally it lies in their inability to think of themselves as being nothing but the repressive arm of the State and society. Clearly this is an inheritance of the Raj, which came in handy to the post-Independence political leadership and the higher bureaucracy.
Yes, the BRT crammed the private vehicles for space while the buses whistled by. But was not that the idea? That a fast, efficient and reliable service would make people switch to public transport?
I’m aware that it’s only when you, or someone you love, is unwell that you realise the importance of doctors and nurses. But that’s not quite my subject today. Instead, I want to draw your attention to a quality that reveals itself after doctors and nurses become critical: the goodness we take for granted. It’s what we all rely on but often do not see or, at least, fully appreciate.
Growing up in the 1960s, I thought of the West Indies and the New Zealand as constituting the North and South Poles of world cricket. Both were English-speaking, both had Christian populations that lived on islands and (in terms of numbers) could comfortably fit into one medium-sized Indian city.
I welcome you all to the commentary from the Melbourne Cricket Ground on this gloomy Sunday. Eh, what was that? So what if it’s bright and sunny, people can get glum even on bright sunny days, can’t they? You come to Delhi when it’s 45 degrees in the shade and you’ll know sunny days are a pain.
Bustling Mumbai is undoubtedly India's most vibrant metropolis, but with 60% of its 13 million population living in slums, inevitable shortfalls in housing, sanitation and nutrition make people susceptible to infection.
If the vault of freedom in the world’s largest democracy can only be unlocked by de-activating restrictive numerical encryptions like Section 66A and Section 377, then the Supreme Court has given us an important key or two.
If you believe that nine separate attacks on churches and several others on Christian-run schools in the last six months are just random occurrences then you also probably believe in the tooth fairy.
Many years ago, Jagdish Bhagwati, a very distinguished economist long before he became one of the patron saints of the NDA, published an important paper on what he called Directly Unproductive Activities or DUP.
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