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HindustanTimes Mon,15 Sep 2014

Interviews-Sports

Yogesh Pardesh the real striker

The incredible story of the World Number 1 carrom player, Yogesh Pardeshi who is the he’s the reigning national and world champion.

Great athletes often come back to avoid regrets

Sportsmen very rarely, if ever, have a fairytale ending. Basketball's greatest wizard Michael Jordan ended his career as a wizard, literally. Rohit Bhaskar reports.

‘Call me a madman, but I feel Croatia can win Euro’

In a revealing interview, Croatia’s coach Slaven Bilic talks tactics and about his team’s Euro 2012 campaign that began with a resounding 3-1 win over Ireland on Sunday. This is Bilic’s last tournament as an international coach as he will join Lokomotiv Moscow. Excerpts:

Art of batting

The little master shares with Pradeep Magazine his evolution as a batsman and how he perfected different strokes over the years. Click here for 'Master mind' part II of the interview.

Master mind

Playing shots are as important as not playing them, explains Sachin Tendulkar in this concluding part of his exclusive interview to HT. He also talks about the immense pressure he faced during the wait to score his 100th ton. Click here for part I of the interview.

Sportsmen never get satisfied

Having devoted the last two years to the London Olympics mission, Sushil’s priority on Monday was to fly home at the earliest. He didn’t mind sleeping for just a few hours before checking out of the Games Village at 6.30am to catch his flight. The ace grappler interacted with HT at the airport.

Sporting life is limited

His size 17 shoes tread softly on the lush carpet of the Aspire Dome, the sports hub of Qatar. He moves, talks and smiles in a deliberate way, with no trace of aggression despite an imposing 1.95m frame. N Ananthanarayanan talks to Ian Thorpe.

Been true to cricket, hope to play again: Sreesanth

In a freewheeling chat with HT for over an hour, Sreesanth spoke about his friends, parties, habits, marriage and of course, the controversial over where he tucked in a towel. Varghese K George reports.

‘He has achieved, whatever he dreamt long back’

It was on July 13, 1995 that 13-year-old Abhinav came to me for his first lessons. I could see the spark in the boy’s eyes...he used to practice for around seven to eight hours a day, recollects Lt Col JS Dhillon.
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