Advertisement

HindustanTimes Tue,30 Sep 2014

Lifestyle

Hit the ground running
Sumedha Deo , Hindustan Times
Mumbai, October 22, 2013
First Published: 13:41 IST(22/10/2013)
Last Updated: 14:17 IST(22/10/2013)

Registrations for the Mumbai marathon closed a couple of months ago, and participants have been training hard for the run. Whether you’re running the full (42.195 km) — or half-marathons (21 km) or the Dream Run (6 km), there are some precautions you must take before and while you train. With less than three months for the event, this is when you can work on improving your timing, avoid injuries and getting acquainted with the route. We get experts to share fitness tips for you.

For beginners
It’s not too late to start your prep, in case you’re still thinking of running the marathon. This is especially true for the Dream Run. “Those who want to participate in the marathon can begin training anywhere between 15 to 24 weeks before the event,” says holistic health guru, Mickey Mehta. “Your exercise regime should be well-planned taking into consideration your fitness levels. Special attention should be paid to amateur runners. It is recommended that you begin with basic training after a go-ahead from your physician.”

Familiarise yourself with the terrain and prepare, literally, for any ups and downs. “You will inevitably encounter uneven terrain, so you must spend time training on them. This also improves functional strength and running economy,” says Praveen Tokas, strength and conditioning expert. “While doing this, do not make the mistake of sprinting downhill as that increases the likelihood of delayed onset of muscle soreness.”

For experienced runners
“Your heart function is most important. Endurance runners need to have a powerful heart. Too much stress, too soon, can cause other health related issues as well,” says Mehta. He suggests gradually letting your heart get used to the training. “Rest also plays an important role as it ensures that your muscles and all body systems feel refreshed and recovered,” he adds.

Tokas suggests building endurance by long distance and interval running as well as cross training. “Long runs are used to build endurance. They progressively train the body to become more efficient at utilising oxygen. They involve running at a slow, comfortable pace, allowing you to carry on a conversation,” he says. For interval runs, he suggests that you begin with an easy run of 400 metres, followed by a few 100-metre runs at tempo pace. A tempo run is a steady, 20-minute run at a pace that you can manage for 50 to 60 minutes. “For cross training, include swimming, biking, water jogging, rowing or strength training,” says Tokas. “Cross training can reduce the likelihood of overuse injuries since it shifts the stress of training to different muscle groups, or stresses the same muscles used during running in a slightly different ways.”

12-week schedule for experienced runners

Week 1-2
Monday: Walk/run 30 min
Tuesday: Tempo run 20 min
Wednesday: Cross train 30 min
Thursday: 2 km easy run
(conversation speed)
Friday: 1 km run
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: 2.5 km easy run

Week 3-5
Monday: Walk/run 30 min
Tuesday: Tempo run 25 min
Wednesday: Cross train 30 min
Thursday: Weeks 3-4 — interval run with 3 sets of 400 metres; Week 5 — 3 km easy run
Friday: 1.5 km easy run
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: 4 km run

Week 6-7
Monday: Walk/run 30 min
Tuesday: Tempo run 35 min
Wednesday: Cross train 30 min
Thursday: 20 min hill run
Friday: 2 km easy run
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: 6 km run

Week 8-10
Monday: Walk/run 30 min
Tuesday: Tempo run 35 min
Wednesday: Cross train 30 min
Thursday: Interval run of
5-6 sets of 400 metres
Friday: 3 km run
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: 7 km run

Week 11-12
Monday: Walk/run 30 min
Tuesday: Tempo run 20 min
Wednesday: Cross train 30 min
Thursday: 2 km easy run
Friday: 1 km easy run
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: Race day


Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 HT Media Limited. All Rights Reserved