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HindustanTimes Sun,13 Jul 2014

Rashid Irani

Review: Honeydripper

Even though it doesn’t measure up to John Sayles's finest films (Lone Star, Men With Guns, Sunshine State), this musical fable is certainly a must watch, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Outsourced

Based on his experiences while travelling in India, the outcome is a waste of the viewer’s time, money and tolerance, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Blindness

Adapted from Jose Saramago's novel, Blindness combines the nightmarish scenario of a sightless universe with an overload of symbolism and gimmicks, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Igor

Here’s another addition to the ongoing glut of computer-animated comedies and a pleasant enough adventure remarkable especially for its visual dexterity, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Big Stan

Former Saturday Night Live comedian Rob Schneider now makes his debut as a director with this wannabe laugh-riot, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Meet Bill

The screenplay, authored by one of the co-directors, Melisa Wallack, is littered with flat jokes and one-dimensional stereotypes, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Igor

Here’s another addition to the ongoing glut of computer-animated comedies. Although elements are ripped off from Shrek and Ratatouille, here’s a pleasant enough adventure remarkable especially for its visual dexterity, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Bride Wards

This screechy comedy is barely viewable even for loyal fans of the two female leads. They (Hudson-Hathaway) portray brides-to-be celebrating their upcoming nuptials at one of Manhattan’s plushiest hotels, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Gran Torino

No pride, no prejudice. Clint Eastwood’s ongoing plea for a violence-free America continues with the 30th film directed by the actor-producer-auteur, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: 17 Again

Body-swap age-reversal stories have been filmic fodder for the past several decades. A derivative confection about a grownup who magically reverts to teen-hood, 17 Again is decidedly inferior to the trailblazing Big (1988) or the more recent Freaky Friday and 13 Going on 30, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: 3:10 to Yuma

After the Oscar-winning success of the Johnny Cash biopic, Walk the Line (2005), director James Mangold has turned to the near-extinct genre of the western, writes Rashid Irani.

Review: Terminator Salvation

Terminator Salvation boasts all the sound and fury ensured by a mega-budget. Despite the blitzkrieg of eye-popping special effects, the outcome is lifeless, reviews Rashid Irani.

Review: Hangover

Bachelors on the brink of marriage will have their fantasies-come-true with Hangover. It is a cleverly written, slickly photographed and expertly acted comedy, reviews Rashid Irani.

Review: Bolt

The script is studded with satirical swipes at the ratings-obsessed TV executives as well as self-deprecatory allusions to the Hollywood movies and topnotch cartoon flicks like Finding Nemo reviews Rashid Irani.

Review: Ice Age

Call it the curse of the threequel. The third instalment of the adventures of the animated prehistoric critters doesn’t measure up to the standards set by the original Ice Age (2002) or its follow-up ...The Meltdown (2006), writes Rashid Irani.
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