Authority to change layout of urban areas along Yamuna Expressway | noida | Hindustan Times
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Authority to change layout of urban areas along Yamuna Expressway

The Yamuna Expressway industrial development authority (YEIDA) on Monday said it has decided to make changes to the layout of urban areas along the 165km expressway to resolve issues faced by plot allottees and to bring in investment in industries.

noida Updated: Dec 12, 2016 23:37 IST
The authority’s proposal to acquire 2.5 lakh hectare agriculture land along the expressway to house 35 lakh people by 2031, as per its master plan, is yet to pick up pace.
The authority’s proposal to acquire 2.5 lakh hectare agriculture land along the expressway to house 35 lakh people by 2031, as per its master plan, is yet to pick up pace.(HT File)

The Yamuna Expressway industrial development authority (YEIDA) on Monday said it has decided to make changes to the layout of urban areas along the 165km expressway to resolve issues faced by plot allottees and to bring in investment in industries.

Yamuna Expressway connects Greater Noida with Agra.

The Uttar Pradesh government had on April 24, 2001, established YEIDA to build the expressway, set up industries and develop urban areas along this road. However, the authority’s proposal to acquire 2.5 lakh hectare agriculture land along the expressway to house 35 lakh people by 2031, as per its master plan, is yet to pick up pace.

Around 2.5 lakh hectare land in 1,187 villages of six districts — Gautam Budh Nagar, Bulandshahar, Aligarh, Hathras, Mathura and Agra — have been notified under YEIDA. However, no industries have been set up by the authority in the last 15 years.

The authority said it will implement the changes on the ground once the board approves the proposal of making make changes to the plan.

“We can easily make changes in the layout of a sector — institutional, industrial or commercial — as planned urban areas are lying vacant at present. Once buildings are constructed, we will not be able to make the required changes. Therefore, we will first approve this proposal in our board and later implement the same,” Amarnath Upadhyay, the additional chief executive officer of YEIDA, said.

Around 21,000 allottees are failing to get possession of their residential plots because farmers are not parting with their land and have challenged the acquisition in court.

“Approval of the new proposal will mean that the authority will be able to shift the location of an allotted plot. For example, if we have allotted a particular plot in a sector that is tied in a dispute, we will shift the same to a new location if the allottee agrees to it. Institutional or industrial plots that have been encroached upon will be shifted to a new location,” Upadhyay said.