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Here is what helped Nico Rosberg beat Lewis Hamilton to win Formula One title

Nico Rosberg learned meditation techniques at Kyoto in Japan as he constructed his title-winning campaign in the face of a fierce and sometimes bitter rivalry with Mercedes teammate and three-time champion Lewis Hamilton.

other sports Updated: Dec 03, 2016 09:49 IST
AFP
Formula One world champion Nico Rosberg, who announced his retirement on Friday, arrives with his wife Vivian Sibold at a FIA gala at Hofburg Palace in Vienna on Friday. Rosberg received his F1 championship trophy at the Gala.
Formula One world champion Nico Rosberg, who announced his retirement on Friday, arrives with his wife Vivian Sibold at a FIA gala at Hofburg Palace in Vienna on Friday. Rosberg received his F1 championship trophy at the Gala.(AP)

Berlin

Nico Rosberg enlisted the help of a Japanese Zen master to help inspire him to his maiden Formula One world title, Der Spiegel weekly magazine reported Friday just hours after the German announced his shock retirement.

Rosberg learned meditation techniques at Kyoto in Japan as he constructed his title-winning campaign in the face of a fierce and sometimes bitter rivalry with Mercedes teammate and three-time champion Lewis Hamilton.

Read more | Why Formula One champion Nico Rosberg put a sudden brake to his racing career

“In simple terms, the goal is to work on the full consciousness,” he told Spiegel.

“You take the time to relax and to concentrate on your feelings. You learn to accept your emotions, including negative emotions like anger and worry.”

Rosberg added: “The world of Formula One is a little cracked. There are a lot of egos coming up against each other.”

Read more | Lewis Hamilton sad, but not surprised by Nico Rosberg’s retirement

“Everyone thinks first of themselves and tries to take advantage of situations to the detriment of others. It’s a small world with a lot of money.”

Rosberg is not the first sportsman to use alternative methods of preparing for his events.

Twelve-time Grand Slam tennis title winner Novak Djokovic revealed at Wimbledon in 2015 that he visited a Buddhist temple close to the All England Club in order to collect his thoughts before a big match.