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Chhota Tyson packs a punch

other Updated: Oct 12, 2010 01:00 IST
Indraneel Das
Indraneel Das
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

When Suranjoy Singh walked out for his post-match media interaction after beating Haroon Khan of Pakistan, he had two bruises — one just above his chin and the other on his lips.

And he was, as most boxers are, oblivious of the pain. For him, the wounds are just a reflection of the effort and hard work a boxer puts inside the ring.

“Injury doesn’t hurt, but losses do,” he said after beating Khan, brother of England’s Olympic silver medallist Amir Khan, who was not selected
for England.

Even when not boxing, Suranjoy keeps moving his head, body and feet. Inside the ring, his movement just needs to pick up pace. His hands follow the swift movement of his feet. His quick reflexes help him get under or swivel away from a punch. In short, when he is in song, his movements resemble a well-oiled machine — everything working in a harmonious unison.

After a bad morning where three Indian boxers lost in the semi-finals, Suranjoy stepped into the ring to face Haroon in the second bout of the evening.

Keeping a close guard and crouching to reduce the target area, the southpaw from Imphal gauged his opponent with some jabs. Slowly, as the seconds ticked on, Suranjoy started unleashing his combinations of right and left to open up Khan and seized all opportunities to score. After three rounds of fiery fight, Suranjoy won on points 9-3.

“I felt bad about my teammates who lost in the morning but I had to focus on my fight and that’s what I did,” he said.

Despite Vijender’s shock defeat and three boxers’ loss in the morning, India can still hope to finish with a record medal haul if one of the three boxers — Suranjoy, Paramjeet Samota and Manoj Kumar — end up with a gold.

In the last bout of the day, Paramjit Samota beat F.A. Junior of Tonga.

Earlier, boxers from Northern Ireland and England out-thought India’s Amandeep Singh, Jai Bhagwan and Dilbagh Singh.

Even in the morning bout Jai Bhagwan got two warnings and was docked four points against Tom Stalker, who had played a close-guard match.