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Woods mad at missing out on more history

other Updated: Aug 11, 2007 14:10 IST

Reuters
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Nothing annoys Tiger Woods more than wasting opportunities to win majors but he was mad after narrowly missing out on shooting a record 62 at the US PGA Championship on Friday.

The world number one lipped out with a birdie putt from 15 feet at the last and had to settle for a record-equaling seven-under-par 63 at a sun-baked Southern Hills Country Club.

"I hit a good putt, and I thought I made it," three-times champion Woods told reporters after ending the second round two strokes clear of the field on six-under 134.

"It would have been nice to have gotten a record and got a three-shot lead going into the weekend. The good thing is I hit a good putt, and that's the important part. It just didn't go in.

"I was just trying to get myself back in this tournament. And lo and behold, here I am."

Woods, hunting a 13th major title this week, became the 21st player to shoot a 63 in one of golf's grand slam events.

Six off the pace at the start of the day, Woods treated the swarming galleries at Southern Hills to a master class as he reeled off eight birdies, one chip-in and a solitary bogey.

Golfing History

He needed only 24 putts on greens he described as a little bumpy in the late afternoon, but failed to sink the putt that would have earned him another slice of golfing history.

"I was trying to make it," the 31-year-old American said of his left-to-right breaking attempt.

"I hit it a little bit firm but I thought I made it because it was breaking at the end. I knew it broke a lot more at the end than at the beginning."

"It started diving. Evidently didn't want to go in."

Long motivated by tournament victories, and especially the record 18 majors held by his childhood idol Jack Nicklaus, Woods was delighted to have taken control at Southern Hills.

The game's leading player has triumphed seven times out of seven when holding at least a share of the 36-hole lead in majors.

"That certainly does give you confidence, there's no doubt," he said of his 100 percent success rate in golf's biggest events. "I know what to do. It's just a matter of going out there and doing it."

"We've got a long way to go. We're only at the halfway point. I need to continue to do what I'm doing. I know there are a lot of guys playing well, and hopefully I can play a little bit better."

Eager to win his first major since last year's PGA Championship at Medinah, Woods said he had played almost as well on Thursday when he opened with a 71.

"I felt almost as good yesterday with my ball striking," he added. "I just lost the round a little bit there in the middle part of the round. I never got it back."

"As I said yesterday, I hit the ball better than my score indicated. And I felt good about today because I hit the ball well yesterday."