Purnia police’s Meri Pathshala gives wings to disadvantaged girls | patna | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jan 21, 2018-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Purnia police’s Meri Pathshala gives wings to disadvantaged girls

Giving wings to their dreams is Meri Pathshala, a Purnia police initiative that aims to educate disadvantaged girls lodged in shelter homes run by NGOs.

patna Updated: Sep 23, 2017 10:20 IST
Aditya Nath Jha
Meri Pathshala is being run by Purnia police at six places in the district
Meri Pathshala is being run by Purnia police at six places in the district(AFP/REPRESENTATIVE PICTURE)

Thanks to the efforts of police in Purnia, a town in north-eastern Bihar, as many as 52 helpless girls are able to dream big.

Giving wings to their dreams is Meri Pathshala, a Purnia police initiative that aims to educate disadvantaged girls lodged in shelter homes run by NGOs.

Kalpna (name changed), a 17-year-old girl from Jammu and Kashmir, was staring at a bleak future when she was rescued from the clutches of a migrant labourer in Purnia district early this year.

More than six months after, she feels at home pursuing her education quite enthusiastically at a home run by Nari Gunjan.

Another girl, Rashmi (name changed), too has shown extraordinary talents in picking up numbers.

They want to become financially independent after completing their studies.

Sudha Varghese, secretary of Nari Gunjan, thanks the police for its initiative to create interest in education among the inmates of the NGO’s Purnia centre.

“Education empowers human beings and I am really very happy seeing police officials so much enthusiastic about providing education to these special children,” she said.

“When I made a call to Purnia superintendent of police Nishant Tiwary, he immediately offered all support,” Varghese told HT. “Police officials will not only teach these girls at the Nari Gunjan centre, but also provide them reading and writing materials,” the Padma Shri recipient social worker said.

“We want these girls to become financially independent, and for this we will impart them skill development training,” Varghese said.

Tiwary, who inaugurated the Meri Pathshala unit at Nari Gunjan, said police officials, preferably women, would visit the NGO centre every day and teach the girls for two hours between 12 noon and 2 pm.

“Police are supposed to maintain law and order. But we want to do something more. Hence, as part of the Meri Pathshala initiative, police officials are assigned duty to teach children at remote places where people are still not taking much interest in educating their wards. So far Meri Pathshala is being run by Purnia police at six places in the district,” he said.

“After these children become well conversant with letters and numbers, they will be enrolled in government schools,” the SP said.