Fort ruled by three kings has a story in every corner | pune news | Hindustan Times
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Fort ruled by three kings has a story in every corner

The Yadav kings built a chain of such forts on the border of their kingdoms. Rohida fort near Bhor, which is 60km from Pune, was one of most important forts in their defence chain.

pune Updated: Jul 17, 2017 13:18 IST
Ashish Phadnis
A carving on the fort’s third exit showcasing that it belonged to Mohammad Adil Shah
A carving on the fort’s third exit showcasing that it belonged to Mohammad Adil Shah(HT PHOTO)

During the Yadava regime, the time where wars were rampant, several forts were built to protect the land from enemy armies. While some forts were used as strong a defence centre, some were built for the purpose of being a watch tower. The duty of these forts was to alert their army about the approaching invasion and delay the enemy’s progress towards the kingdom. 

The Yadav kings built a chain of such forts on the border of their kingdoms. Rohida fort near Bhor, which is 60km from Pune, was one of most important forts in their defence chain. The fort has experienced few ferocious battles around it and has even switched sides between kingdoms. 

In 1656, Mohammad Adil Shah won the fort and invested in improving its fortifications. The carved script on the third entrance door clearly depicts that the fort was under his control. But after the rise of Chhatrapati Shivaji, the fort was once again captured by Marathas, but was handed over to Mughals during the ‘Treaty of Purandar’ in 1666. 

Birthplace of a hero 

The surrounding area of Rohida fort is known for producing great warriors. Bajiprabhu Deshpande was one of them. He acted as the in-charge of the fort and played a key role in various battles. However, he is famous for his last battle in Pavankhind, en route from Panhala to Vishalgad in Kolhapur district. He, along with 300 warriors, kept thousands of enemies at bay and fought till their last breath. 

How to reach 

It takes a two-hour walk from the base village called Bajarwadi to the fort. Several ancient building, temples, bastions and rock carved water cisterns can be seen on the till date.