Job-assured engineering courses turn major attraction for rural students in Pune | pune news | Hindustan Times
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Job-assured engineering courses turn major attraction for rural students in Pune

Every year the fee structure of all courses increases creating a huge problem for families that have a low overall income, especially those below the Rs. 1 lakh per annum mark

pune Updated: Jul 06, 2017 16:43 IST
Ananya Barua
Data shows 70,000 students applied for engineering courses from rural areas, while 50,000 were from urban places.
Data shows 70,000 students applied for engineering courses from rural areas, while 50,000 were from urban places.(Pratham Gokhale/HT PHOTO)

A recent report by the Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) suggests that engineering courses have more rural aspirants than urban candidates.

An official from the Directorate of Technical Education stated, “We were trying to gauge the trend around engineering aspirants, and surprisingly we found that engineering colleges now have aspirants mostly coming from the rural parts of the state. These families have a yearly family income lower than Rs 1 lakh.”

As per the data, an approximate figure of 70,000 students applying for engineering courses were from rural areas, while 50,000 aspirants were from urban areas. The trend is because of favourable government policies and the problem of affordability of other courses, said Dayanand Meshram, DTE Joint Director.

“Every year the fee structure of all courses increases. This creates a huge problem for families that have a low overall income, especially those below the Rs. 1 lakh per annum mark. In such cases, it is the government incentives and subsidies that come to their rescue, without which they would not be in a position to continue education. Scholarships too open doors for them,” Meshram said.

“The opportunity to get admitted to an engineering college in a city has a huge aspirational value for rural students. It is a dream come true, and now more and more students wish to attain it. Also, courses such as engineering and medical, traditionally have been held on a high pedestal, with considerably good placements. Pune being the Oxford of the east, engineering colleges have much better opportunities, facilities and eventually better placements than colleges in rural areas. This attracts a large number of students from rural spheres, into these courses,” said Dr Bharatkumar Ahuja, Director of College of Engineering, Pune (COEP).

“I believe there has come a realisation among rural students to expand their horizons, and educate themselves, which will help them both socially and economically.They are no longer just interested in conventional courses, they want to experiment. The only problem they face is of language, but they can overcome it,” adds Ashwini Deshmukh, Assistant Professor at Trinity College of Engineering and Research.

According to DTE, a total of 1.19 lakh candidates had registered to participate in the centralised admission process (CAP), and almost 50 per cent of them have a yearly family income lower than Rs 1 lakh. Among the rest, almost 31,000 students have been stated to have an annual family income of over Rs 5 lakh.