Advertisement

HindustanTimes Tue,29 Jul 2014

Moga village a haven for drug addicts? police remove board

Surinder Maan, Hindustan Times  Moga, May 31, 2014
First Published: 07:26 IST(31/5/2014) | Last Updated: 07:45 IST(31/5/2014)

Following an HT report on the “derogatory” signboard put up by the police at Daulewala village, 17 km from here, the police removed them on Friday. The local police had installed the board at the entrance of the village dubbing it as a hub of narcotic smuggling.

The boards mentioned that Daulewala is a village known for drug smugglers and everyone entering it will be under the police scanner.

Sources said that following reports in a section of the media, chief minister Parkash Singh Badal took a serious note of the police activity and issued orders to remove the boards immediately.

As soon as the police administration received the orders, a special police party reached the spot and removed them.

Dharamkot DSP Rachhpal Singh Dhindsa said he was not aware of the latest development.

Jog a Singh, a resident of the village, said several policemen came to the village on Friday evening and removed the boards that were installed on Wednesday night while the villagers were sleeping.

“The police hurt our sentiments as to how come all residents can be involved in illegal drug trade. Our daughters and sons are of marriageable age. We have condemned the drug trade.

But if the police resort to such measures, it would be harmful for our young generation,” he said.

After years of some Akali leader under attack for carrying out drug business from Daulewala village, also known as ‘drug haven’ of Punjab, the police had cracked down on the drug mafia in the village six days ago.

In the past nine years, the village with nearly 400 households has 390 cases registered against its residents pertaining to drug peddling.

According to police, each of these cases has the involvement of two or more accused from the village.

According to the police, drug buyers descend on the village every day, many in luxury cars, to buy their quota of contraband.

Harwinder Singh, a youth of the village, said, “We will start a drive against the ‘chitta’ (a drug chemical). No doubt, we need the constructive help of the police for stopping the illegal drug trade in the village, but not the police activity like installing derogatory signboards.”

When contacted, newly appointed senior superintendent of police Gursharan Singh Sandhu said, “Though such boards were installed recently, the intention of the police was not bad.

But I think the wording on the boards was derogatory. Therefore, we decided to remove them.”

comment Note: By posting your comments here you agree to the terms and conditions of www.hindustantimes.com
blog comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement
more from Bathinda
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 HT Media Limited. All Rights Reserved