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HindustanTimes Fri,31 Oct 2014

Tytler not proven guilty, eligible to file nomination: Masjid Menon

ANI  New Delhi, March 05, 2014
First Published: 15:43 IST(5/3/2014) | Last Updated: 17:55 IST(5/3/2014)

Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) leader Masjid Menon on Wednesday said that allegations against former MP Jagdish Tytler regarding his involvement in the 1984 Sikh riots have not been proven yet, which made him eligible to file the nomination to contest the upcoming Lok Sabha polls.

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The allegations against Tyler have not been proven yet, and therefore he is not disqualified to file a nomination to contest elections.

Till the time the accusations against him are proven, we cannot label him as a criminal, said Menon.

As far as the sentiments of the people are concerned, especially the ones affected by the 1984 riots, I would like to clarify that Tyler has just showed his willingness to contest elections, but the Congress has not given a green signal to that yet. They are going to think about it carefully, and then come to a conclusion, he said.

I am no one to interfere in their business, but as far as my opinion is concerned, I would only like to suggest that Congress should not allow any such person to contest elections who has been accused of something in the past, and those charges have been proven, he added.

Tyler's candidature was withdrawn by Congress in the last Lok Sabha polls due to protests over his alleged role in 1984 anti-Sikh riots.

He filed his nomination for north-east Lok Sabha seat under primaries project in Delhi yesterday which has generated a debate amongst political leaders and people of the country.

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