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HindustanTimes Mon,14 Jul 2014

‘I cannot sing item numbers'

Archna Matharu , Hindustan Times   April 19, 2013
First Published: 10:19 IST(19/4/2013) | Last Updated: 10:21 IST(19/4/2013)

Be it a soulful composition or a foot-tapping melody, singer Kavita Seth has proved that she can pull of just about any genre of singing with the same ease and poise.

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The famous singer is now all set to cast her musical spell once again with the song Murabba from upcoming Bollywood flick, Bombay Talkies. The song has been composed by Amit Trivedi and penned by Amitabh Bhattacharya, while the film has been directed by Anurag Kashyap.

“Amitabh Bhattacharya has written interesting lyrics, relating Murabba to everyday life. I feel lucky to have gotten the chance to be a part of this film, since it talks about the fans of Amitabh Bachchan,” says the singer.

Since the beginning of her musical career with Bollywood, Kavita has been associated with soothing and meaningful songs. The singer adds that for her, it is a conscious choice to sing only meaningful lyrics. “For me, lyrics of the song are very important. There has to be some meaning and poetic element in words. After Tum Hi Ho Bandhu (Cocktail), I got many offers for item songs. But I cannot sing Chikni Chamelis and Halkat Jawanis; I don’t think I will be able to do justice to them,” she says.

A postgraduate in music and Hindi literature, Kavita is the first person in her family who was inclined towards music from a young age. However, this never proved to be an obstacle for Kavita, who says that she was always fortunate to get support from her family.

“Nobody in my family is associated with music. My husband was an engineer. Nonetheless, I had full support from my family, which is very important for achieving anything in life. Whatever
I am today, is due to my family,” she says.

Actor-director Satish Kaushik gave her the first break in Bollywood with the song, Zindagi Ko Maula in Vaada (2005). Subsequently, she sang celebrated songs such as Mujhe Mat Roko in Gangster, Iktara in Wake Up Sid (which fetched her many awards including a Filmfare) and recently, Tum Hi Ho Bandhu from Cocktail.

As an empanelled artiste at Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) for Sufi music, Kavita travels across the world and has performed in various countries.

Although Sufi music is her specialty, and a genre closest to her heart, Kavita does not mind exploring different genres of music. “Due to my classical training, I can sing a song like Iktara as well as Tum Hi Ho Bandhu,” she says, adding that classical training is a must for every singer. She has also been a music director for three songs in the 2008 film, Yeh Mera India.

Her collection of music albums includes Ek Din (Universal Music), OM (Sa Re Ga Ma), Sufiaana (Times Music), Kabirana Sufiana (EMI), Bulleshah (EMI), Jaam-e-Sufi (Hungama Digital) and Khuda Wohi Hai (Times Music).

Kavita says it is the work of musical legends that inspires her to work harder, since they were only concerned with their work and not bothered about fame.

Her word of advice to all aspiring singers and musicians is to be unique. “Every performer has their own style; they just need to explore that and work on it,” she signs off.

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