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HindustanTimes Mon,22 Dec 2014

The offbeat songbird

SD Sharma , Hindustan Times   November 12, 2012
First Published: 10:39 IST(12/11/2012) | Last Updated: 10:44 IST(12/11/2012)

‘Any genre of music is an art, because it awakens the consciousness of a man’s mind,” said acclaimed Bollywood singer Rekha Bhardwaj, at a media interaction at Chandigarh Press Club, Sector 27, on Sunday.

Credited with over two-dozen films, Bhardwaj is the recipient of National Award for Best Female Playback Singer for Badi Dheere Jali, Ishqiya (2011), a Filmfare Award for Best Female Playback Singer for Genda Phool, Delhi-6 (2010) and Darling from Saat Khoon Maaf (shared with Usha Uthup).

Trained in Hindustani classical music under Pandit Amarnath, Bhardwaj holds mastery over lighter genres such as thumri, ghazal, sufiana and devotional music, besides being an accomplished music composer. “Born and raised in a ‘musical’ family, my obsession surfaced to recognition as I composed ghazals while studying at   the Renaissance College, Hong Kong, and melted unto a profession after my marriage to Vishal Bhardwaj,” she shared.

“Lyrics are the soul of any song; music, which reflects emotions, must be sculpted in an appealing paradigm of words,” says she, lamenting that today words are being fitted in to the frame of tune.

“Though I haven’t given the industry a large number of songs, since my association with it since 1996, I have given quality songs such as Namak Ishq Ka and Genda Phool. My upcoming projects are with Vishal Bhardwaj and Gulzar, which includes the making of Ishka Ishka but we are according more priority to an album of poetry of legendary poet Bashir Badr sahib,” says she.

“My forthcoming songs also include a lori composed by Shanker Ehsan Loy, Matru Ki Bijli Ka Mandola, besides some songs for AR Rahman and Ahmed-Nadeem,” concludes Bhardwaj, who was in Chandigarh for a charitable concert organised by the Rani Breast Cancer Trust.

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