City hospital employs folk theatre to overcome myths on joint replacement | punjab | Hindustan Times
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City hospital employs folk theatre to overcome myths on joint replacement

punjab Updated: Jun 09, 2013 22:08 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Nothing can remove a misconception better than folk theatre even in the present mechanised world. That was exactly the course adopted by the city's Amandeep Hospital, which employed the histrionics of actor, director, producer and theatre personality Kewal Dhaliwal, to explode the myths related to joint replacement surgeries.

The hospital is since celebrating 5,000 successful navigated (computer-assisted ) joint replacement surgeries.

Dhaliwal presented 'bhand-style' theatre during a cultural programme that also included Giddha, Bhangra and skits. The celebrations, in which 50 patients who had undergone joint replacement were invited from all over the country, included Arif Chaudhary, a legal consultant with the ministry of interior, Pakistan.

At least eight patients, including Chaudhary from Lahore, shared their stories with the audience while many others took help of multimedia for this purpose. Chaudhary claimed to the media that he was now able to walk for an hour daily after the surgery. He said that he had come alone without any friends or family and had got both his knees operated on at the Amandeep hospital.

"I enjoyed my stay at the hospital, which is something that few patients could ever experience," he said. He further said that Pakistan lacked the kind of expertise that Indian doctors have gained over the years. Dr Upinder Jeet Kaur, a former finance minister, who too had got her knee replacement done at this hospital, presided over the function.

Dr Avtar Singh, chief orthopaedic surgeon of the hospital, said that as many as eight lakh people around the world go in for joint replacement surgery every year and lead better lives once again. "The number of such patients in India is 75,000 per year and this figure is steadily increasing," he said.

Brushing aside myths, he said that joint replacement lasted up to 40 years.

"Another myth is that this surgery is only for the elderly, while people as young as 20 too have undergone the procedure as per their needs. Some also think it is a very painful procedure but with latest pain management techniques this drawback too has been overcome," he said.