City residents made aware about bad effects of tobacco | punjab | Hindustan Times
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City residents made aware about bad effects of tobacco

punjab Updated: Jun 01, 2013 21:14 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Mohandai Oswal Hospital (MOH)observed No Tobacco Day by organising a programme at Vardhman Spinning Mills here on Saturday.


A team of doctors comprising Dr Rajender Gupta and Dr Pallavi made the staff and labourers of the spinning mills aware about bad effects of tobacco on their physical and mental health. The doctors appealed to the labourers not to chew tobacco.

BD Bhardwaj, vice-president of the spinning mills, also talked about the bad effects of tobacco. He encouraged the labourers to avoid tobacco using products, as it causes many diseases.

Another programme was organised by students of nursing at MOH. The students performed a play to sensitise the staff and patients of the hospital that consumption of tobacco could cause cancer.

Madhu Ruchi Lamba, vice-president of MOH, said tobacco use was the main cause of cancer, which could be prevented by making people aware about the bad consequences of tobacco use.

Meanwhile, Kulwant Heart Centre organised an awareness camp for general public and patients, where Dr SS Sibia, Dr MPS Sadana and Dr RPS Batra motivated people to give up the use of tobacco in all forms.

They said use of tobacco have negative health effects and lead to 5.4 million deaths worldwide annually.

“Tobacco not only affects lungs, but also causes cancer in various organs such as lip, tongue, mouth, pharynx, larynx and oesophagus. It also disturbs the socio-economic life of the person and his family members,” said Dr Kulwant Singh, director of the hospital.

Government was also trying to curb the use of tobacco in all its forms, but still much more was to be done so that we could make our society tobacco free and healthy, he added.

According to the studies, some children begin smoking as early as 9-10 years of age. Hence keeping in mind the health and well being of children, Dr Kulwant Singh advised parents to make their children aware of negative consequences of smoking.