Congress trashes Kejriwal’s charge of collusion with SAD | punjab$top | Hindustan Times
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Congress trashes Kejriwal’s charge of collusion with SAD

punjab Updated: Oct 09, 2016 11:06 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal (HT File Photo)

Three Punjab Congress leaders on Saturday dismissed Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal’s charges of “collusion between the Congress and the Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD),” as a figment of imagination.

Following reports that the ruling Akali Dal-BJP government had decided to close a multi-crore corruption case against state Congress chief Captain Amarinder Singh, the AAP national convener said the move was a testimony of the Congress and the ruling Akali Dal colluding to contest the 2017 assembly elections.

“This is a rant of a man who has exposed himself time and again as a big liar. We wonder what is the source of information for Kejriwal that the case is being closed,” Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, Rana Gurjeet Singh and Kewal Dhillon said in a press statement.

Asking Kejriwal to first read the history of the case he was referring to before rushing with his comments, the Congress leaders said: “It’s too early to say anything since the matter is still pending in the court. Kejriwal should know that the case was registered against Amarinder out of sheer political vendetta after having been expelled from the 13th Vidhan Sabha.”

Amarinder’s expulsion, they pointed out, was revoked by a five-member constitutional bench of the Supreme Court.

The Congress MLAs said the case was registered by the Punjab Vigilance Bureau on the basis of a report by the Vidhan Sabha committee headed by Harish Rai Dhanda, who was an Akali legislator at that time. They said when the Supreme Court had rejected the Vidhan Sabha committee report, on whose basis the Punjab Vigilance Bureau filed an FIR, how could it stand legal scrutiny. They said the Vigilance bureau had been trying hard to concoct evidence and had been seeking more time from the court.