Daroli Bhai villages doing what govt couldn't | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Daroli Bhai villages doing what govt couldn't

Inspired by environmentalist Sant Balvir Singh Seechewal, the residents of Daroli Bhai village in Moga district are installing a water purification plant using natural method in the village. The villagers have pooled in money and harping on donations from NRIs to meet the project cost of Rs 4 crore.

punjab Updated: Dec 21, 2013 19:08 IST
Surinder Maan

Inspired by environmentalist Sant Balvir Singh Seechewal, the residents of Daroli Bhai village in Moga district are installing a water purification plant using natural method in the village. The villagers have pooled in money and harping on donations from NRIs to meet the project cost of Rs 4 crore.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2013/12/DaroliBhai_02_compressed.jpg


After chief minister Parkash Singh Badal refused to provide funds for the project, the villagers formed Mata Damodari Charitable Trust six months ago to raise funds for the project.

The 11-member trust has raised `34 lakh through donations from villagers and NRIs and has installed underground sewerage pipeline in some areas of the village, while one of the three ponds of the village has been turned into water purification plant. The work for another such plant is underway.

Each house will have filtering system and a sewerage connection. The sewerage water from the houses would enter three wells one after another and these wells would purify the water. The water from the third well would enter into one of the four open pits and then the purified water could be used for irrigation.

The state president of All India Freedom Fighter Association and senior member of the trust Gurcharan Singh Sangha told HT that two of three ponds would be turned into the treatment plant and sewerage connection would be given to all 1,155 houses of the village.

He said that boating would be introduced at one of the ponds and ornamental plants would be installed on the embankment, while a mini park would also be developed near the pond.

"Cleanliness or lack of it has a direct impact on people's health. Once this project is complete, the health of the 6,105 residents of Daroli Bhai village would be better," said Rachhpal Singh Sosan, block extension educator, community health centre (CHC), Daroli Bhai. "There would be a separate pit at each plant for rainwater harvesting, while the third pond would be developed as a mini-lake," said Gurmeet Singh, former village revenue officer and member of the trust.

When contacted, Moga deputy commissioner Arshdeep Singh Thind said, "I really appreciate the efforts of villagers. Other villages should learn a lesson from Daroli Bhai village and should start such projects in their villages."