Demonetisation effect: Patients suffer as chemists refuse Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes in Ludhiana | punjab$ludhiana | Hindustan Times
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Demonetisation effect: Patients suffer as chemists refuse Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes in Ludhiana

As most of the chemists are not accepting Rs 500 or Rs 1,000 notes, poor patients are unable to buy medicines due to unavailability of low denomination notes.

punjab Updated: Nov 12, 2016 15:42 IST
HT Correspondent
Doctors who are running private clinics or laboratories are also not accepting the scrapped currency notes due to which the patients are bound to suffer.
Doctors who are running private clinics or laboratories are also not accepting the scrapped currency notes due to which the patients are bound to suffer.(HT Representative Image)

As most of the chemists are not accepting Rs 500 or Rs 1,000 notes, poor patients are unable to buy medicines due to unavailability of low denomination notes.

Though long queues are being seen outside banks, many of the patients belonging to economically weaker section are facing trouble in getting low denomination notes, even after three days of demonetisation of currency.

A 48-years-old Raja Ram of Mundian said, “I went to purchase medicines from a drug store on Chandigarh Road. The store owner told me that if I purchase medicine costing Rs 500 only then he can accept Rs 500 note.”

“I have a bank account but in State Bank of India at Sultanpur, Uttar Pradesh. I don’t know where to go now? Due to long queues outside local banks, I could not get my notes exchanged here. I don’t have any debit or credit card. I could not even purchase anything from a general store due to lack of change,”he said.

RK Yadav, who runs a private clinic in Focal Point area, said many migrants are facing problems in procuring medicines from drug stores in absence of required currency notes. “I learned that many of these persons don’t have bank accounts and they generally work as labourers. The government should pay attention towards the problem being faced by these people,”he expressed.

A Chemist, who wished not to be named, said, “The government has not given any instructions to us for accepting Rs 500 or Rs 1,000 notes but people are accusing us of ignoring their plight. We also lack low denomination notes due to which we can’t accept banned notes from every visitor. Will government accept these notes from us, if we take these from the patients?”

Meanwhile, majority of doctors who are running private clinics or laboratories are also not accepting the scrapped currency notes due to which the patients are bound to suffer.

“I had taken an appointment from a skin specialist. Her fee is Rs 400. The receptionist at her clinic asked me to bring low denomination notes only, as Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes will not be acceptable,”lamented Harjot Singh, a patient.“When I went to a drug store, the owner refused to accept Rs 500 note. The government should at least allow the private hospitals and drug stores to accept these notes,” he said.