Denmark to help make city beautiful, cyclist-friendly | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Denmark to help make city beautiful, cyclist-friendly

Denmark is helping the UT administration in making the city roads friendly for pedestrians as well as cyclists. The authorities are also planning to come up with environment-friendly policies such as the “waste to wealth” programme.

punjab Updated: Nov 04, 2015 10:02 IST
Monica Sharma
UT administration

The UT administration plans to adopt the environment-friendly ‘waste to wealth’ initiative of Denmark for solid waste management.(HT Photo)

Denmark is helping the UT administration in making the city roads friendly for pedestrians as well as cyclists. The authorities are also planning to come up with environment-friendly policies such as the “waste to wealth” programme.

UT adviser Vijay Dev said: “The Denmark government will assist us in urban mobility programme for promoting cycling besides the waste to wealth project. We are hopeful of signing a memorandum of understanding by December end or beginning of January.”

The decision follows the visit of senior UT officials, including Vijay Dev, to Copenhagen, Denmark. The purpose of the visit was to study and explore the latest techniques being adopted to manage transport, solid waste disposal and sewage treatment.

UT environment director Santosh Kumar said: “In Denmark, we noticed a very efficient system of non-motorised transport, wherein the use of bicycles is promoted. We were told that 47% of the population in the country uses cycles.”

Keeping in view the good practices adopted by the municipality of Copenhagen, the administration is now in talks with its officials for visiting Chandigarh and studying its master plan for giving suggestions on how to make the City Beautiful pedestrian-and-cyclist-friendly. Santosh Kumar said the visiting team could also suggest some pilot projects for the city that could be implemented in phases.

Santosh Kumar said Denmark also had an efficient system in place for managing ‘malba’ (construction waste) and other solid waste. The residue waste generated by the solid waste management plant in Denmark is just 1% as compared to at least 30% generated by the Dadumajra plant in Chandigarh, he said.

This waste ends up in open dumping grounds and with the vacant areas shrinking in the city, it has become a big issue how to manage the waste. The team from Copenhagen is expected to come to the city by January next year.