Doctors urge relatives of patients to be patient

  • Vandana Singh, Hindustan Times, Ludhiana
  • Updated: Jun 30, 2014 21:38 IST

On this National Doctors' Day, city doctors have urged the patients to understand their profession and not to be impatient.

Dr Hardeep Singh, state president, Punjab Civil Medical Services (PCMS), said, "It is an honour that doctors are called life savers, but we are not God. So, patients and their kin should not accuse doctors of not saving a life as only providing treatment is in their hands. It would be a great gift for us on doctors' day."

Dr Singh said, "We feel depressed when incidents like Mansa, Talwandi Sabo, Bassi Pathana and Kanpur happen. Violence against doctors is bringing sense of insecurity among us."

Dr Raj Kumar Sharma, president of the Indian Medical Association (IMA), Ludhiana, said, "Stress level in doctor's is increasing these days. The discipline in society has declined and some people try to exploit even doctors to get rebate on bills etc."
Dr Sharma expressed concern over the future of doctors of medicine, as competition was increasing due to which the number of people joining this profession was decreasing. Other reason was that the doctors were not given that level of respect as they used to get some years back.

Civil surgeon Dr Subhash Batta said, "The expectations of public from this profession have increased manifolds and that is an achievement for us. But doctors should also be patient and polite, and should not shout back at people, even if they behave indecently in anger."
Significance of the day

Every year, July 1 is celebrated as National Doctor's Day in honour of the legendary physician and second chief minister of West Bengal Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy as mark of respect to the noble profession. Dr Roy was born on July 1, 1882 and died on the same date in 1962. Dr Roy was honoured with the country's highest civilian award "Bharat Ratna".
Doctors overburdened in government hospitals

In government sector, the number of doctors is not sufficient to cater to the increasing number of patients. In Ludhiana district, there are 258 sanctioned posts of medical officers, out of which only 188 have been filled. Thus, the burden shifts to other doctors, who also have to tackle the non-clinical work like postmortem, medical legal report, medical examination and VIP duties.
Senior medical officer Dr RK Karkara said, "In Lord Mahavira Civil Hospital, out of eight posts of emergency medical officer (EMO) only one has been filled, told. I have only one regular EMO in the hospital against the requirement of at least three EMOs for three shifts during a day. So, I have to deploy other doctors on duty at EMOs place."

Inadequate infrastructure and equipment, besides, pay scale is another hindrance for doctors at government hospitals.

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