Fee regulatory panel for medical colleges in Punjab defunct for 6 years: Expert | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Fee regulatory panel for medical colleges in Punjab defunct for 6 years: Expert

This came after the city-based NEET trainer, Dr Arvind Goyal, wrote to the PMO once again seeking directions to regulate the fee structure in private colleges.

punjab Updated: May 15, 2017 12:12 IST
Ifrah Mufti
In a letter to PMO, Dr Goyal has mentioned that after the term of Punjab medical panel was over in 2010, there was no fresh appointment and the panel has been lying defunct for the past six years.
In a letter to PMO, Dr Goyal has mentioned that after the term of Punjab medical panel was over in 2010, there was no fresh appointment and the panel has been lying defunct for the past six years. (For representation)

City-based education expert has written again to the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) to look into the issue of defunct panel in Punjab since 2010 on regulating fee across private unaided medical colleges.

After the health ministry finalised the state wise single window counselling for all the medical colleges and deemed universities, the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) has now directed the ministry to look into the committees to regulate the fees of the private unaided medical colleges.  

This came after the city-based NEET trainer, Dr Arvind Goyal, wrote to the PMO once again seeking directions to regulate the fee structure in private colleges.

The reply received by Dr Arvind Goyal from the health ministry on March 22 had stated that in case of government medical colleges, the respective state governments are responsible for fixation of fees. However, in case of private unaided colleges, the fee structure is decided by the committee set up by the respective state government, under the chairmanship of retired high court judge, in pursuance of the directions of the Supreme Court of India. It is up to the committee to decide whether the fee proposed by an institute is justified and the fee fixed by the committee is binding on the institute.

Dr Goyal said, “The health ministry has mentioned that fee structure of private colleges is to be regulated by the state governments but such committees are not functional in many states. We have again written to the PMO intimating them about the defunct committees and to take action in this regard so that the exploitation of medical aspirants can be stopped.”

In the letter to PMO, Dr Goyal has mentioned that after the term of Punjab medical panel was over in 2010, there was no fresh appointment and the panel has been lying defunct for the past six years.

Dr Goyal has also highlighted that how a private college in Haryana had hiked its fee of MD/MS course to an exorbitant amount of Rs 99 lakh.

“Some of the colleges and deemed universities ask for such exorbitant amounts that majority of the aspirants who are high on merit are not able to afford it and eventually the seat is taken by the candidates who have the money even if they didn’t have higher marks.”

Dr Goyal has sought fresh directives to all the state governments to make these panels and committees functional so that exploitation of medical aspirants by these private medical institutes can be prevented. “If the fee structure is not regulated then the whole purpose of conducting NEET and holding common counselling will be defeated,” he added.