Gian Sagar crisis: Management takes back sacked docs and technicians | punjab$patiala | Hindustan Times
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Gian Sagar crisis: Management takes back sacked docs and technicians

punjab Updated: Apr 14, 2016 15:37 IST
Vivek Gupta
Vivek Gupta
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The classes in the medical college have been suspended since February 25 after the college staff announced an indefinite protest over their pending salaries since September.(HT File Photo)

A day after the state government directed the management of Gian Sagar Medical College, Banur, to stop “victimisation” of its protesting staff, the college on Saturday withdrew the termination letters issued recently to four assistant professors and seven non-teaching staff for leading the protest against the management.

In damage control mode, the management is also trying hard to mobilise funds through several sources to pay at least two months’ salaries to its staff by next week so that they relent.

Read: Gian Sagar Medical College selling assets to pay its staff

The classes in the medical college have been suspended since February 25 after the college staff announced an indefinite protest over their pending salaries since September.

Even as the staff was paid the October and November salaries last week, they did not resume the classes as they wanted the clearance of all pending dues. They later agreed to resume classes in case they were paid two more wages after the state government’s intervention.

Read: Mgmt tells staff to resume classes or face termination

Medical education secretary Hussan Lal said the staff is likely to get at least two more months’ salaries before April 15, which hopefully would end the protest and classes would resume. “The management has assured them that they would be paid the rest of the pending dues by the end of this month and that in future they would get salaries on time, he said.

The withdrawal-of-termination notices were sent to the protesting staff through WhatsApp.

Welcoming the move, a faculty member said that once they were paid, they were ready to take even extra classes to compensate students.

Meanwhile, nearly 200 staff members, who have been camping in front of the college since Thursday, held a free medical camp and examined nearly 300 patients, mostly from nearby villages. They have also circulated leaflets saying they will hold a bigger camp on Monday that will also have the diagnosis facility.

“The idea behind the free camp is to tell the management that they are not anti-institution and are ready to work for its betterment, if paid on time,” a faculty member said.

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