Guest column: ‘Pink’ agitates, raises pertinent questions | punjab$dont-miss | Hindustan Times
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Guest column: ‘Pink’ agitates, raises pertinent questions

There comes a time when we get brilliant movies that move and shake our psyche and our mindset. ‘Pink’ is one of them. It is set in Delhi and could actually mirror any small or large city in Punjab.

Amitabh Bachchan Updated: Oct 11, 2016 14:58 IST
Pink is Bengali director Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury’s debut film in Hindi.
Pink is Bengali director Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury’s debut film in Hindi.(Photo: Twitter)

There comes a time when we get brilliant movies that move and shake our psyche and our mindset. ‘Pink’ is one of them. It is set in Delhi and could actually mirror any small or large city in Punjab. An influential young man and his cronies are having a good time, and invite a bunch of girls for dinner and the fact that they are drinking and wearing western outfits makes them available for sex.

The movie raises brilliant questions and asks that just because one is wearing a skirt, or is from the Northeast they are available for sex? Where is it written or unwritten in the manual code of Manu that this means that they would go all the way? Why do our men think that if the girl is laughing, is smiling and she is drinking with them it means her morals are missing? Does it not hold true for men? Why are men allowed to get away with smiling, laughing and drinking and their morals are intact, while a woman is leading and tempting them to commit a sin?

Isn’t it interesting that it is women who tempt them by wearing clothes, laughing, touching while talking and even sharing an alcoholic drink. Why are men not taught when they are growing up to respect a woman’s choice and her answer?

There is a line where Amitabh Bachchan (kudos to him, love his bi-polar layer acting where he sets a manual code for girls) says we need to save our boys in order to save girls. He says, “No in itself is a complete sentence.” No explanation is needed, nor should be given.

The hard hitting, embarrassing yet truthful dialogues all hit home. Some people at the theatre kept on saying, in spite of watching the movie, till what level should the girls be taught? What should be the level of education? I am wondering whether we should be ‘Gau Mata’ or should we be the embodiment of Shakti /Kali/ Durga as shown by the scriptures?

Why are we seen as threatening? Women are liked and acceptable as long as we are in the boundaries made to suit man. By the way, this is not a feminist rant nor is it a jhola wearing bra-burning stand. It is just a reflection of our times, where a woman is still questioned and frowned if she reaches the grand old senile age of 30, that how come she is not married? She must have had broken engagements or something must be wrong in her ‘kundli.’ Or that age-old stigma that she must be dark and not fair and lovely. How I wish this movie is shown to everyone so that woman’s right, even if she’s your wife, to say No gets ingrained among the men. Till we do not treat our girls and women with respect due to them, we cannot become a developed nation. Do not get bogged down by outer clothing, or lay down a moral policing code and for heaven’s sake do not bring shame upon yourself by thinking that Northeast girls are loose.

She is not a complex arithmetical code that she is easy or tough . And, the hackneyed arguments of the Indian male need to change. The Bharataiya Naari changed and is changing, let her soar and fly.

Yours truly,

A happy, impressed woman viewer

ravneetsangha@hotmail.com

(The writer is a Jalandhar-based freelance contributor)