Haryana: Damaged wheat crop means farmers unlikely to keep buffer | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Haryana: Damaged wheat crop means farmers unlikely to keep buffer

Even as the wheat crop in the state this year has been damaged by the unseasonal rain and hail, the quantity procured this year could well surpass last year's as farmers are not willing to take the risk of storing some portion of their crop as buffer.

punjab Updated: May 06, 2015 19:49 IST
Ishtiyaq Sibtian Joo

Even as the wheat crop in the state this year has been damaged by the unseasonal rain and hail, the quantity procured this year could well surpass last year's as farmers are not willing to take the risk of storing some portion of their crop as buffer.

Most farmers are bringing their full produce to the market as the grain has lost its sheen and it would be costly and impractical for them to store the wheat at their expense.

Consider this, till May 5, all four procuring agencies had bought 4.58 lakh tonnes of wheat in the district compared to last year's May procurement of 4.63 lakh tonnes.

Experts are backing this move by farmers, claiming that the crop does not have quality for it to be later sold private players.

Experts here also believe maintenance of rain affected stock is not possible for farmers therefore clearing the stocks is good option for them.

"Every year, I keep some buffer stock for my family and relatives. However, this year the rain badly affected our crops. I am not sure if my relatives would like to buy what I stock. Therefore, I have brought all my produce in the market," said a farmer Sham Lal said.

"Wheat grain which normally is golden has gone black due to rain and is also soggy. If it is me, I will never purchase such harvest," said Dr Arjun Singh Rana, a retired agricultural economist. There are reports of private players refusing to buy stock from farmers.

"Farmer used to stock and later sell some of his harvest to private players like flour mills at higher prices. However, with rain affecting grain quality, flour mills are purchasing grains from states like Rajasthan, UP, leaving farmers here with no option than to sell everything to the government," said, Surjeet Singh Beniwal, DM, Haryana State Co-operative Supply and Marketing Federation Limited (Hafed).

Hafed is the largest procuring state agency and has procured 1.84 tonnes of wheat in the district. There are procuring agencies that despite agreeing that crop has lost it shine, still vouch for its quality.

"Of course, there is a luster loss and it has scared the farmer. However, quality wise our grain is good," confirms district food and supplies controller (DFSC) Ghanshyam Singh, who till May 5 have procured 1.5 tonnes.

He adds, "We have scientific methods to store the stock as it requires special treatment. Farmers lack access to these facilities and hence, they try and sell the wheat."

The DM adds there is an increase of almost 20% in crop yield due to new varieties getting introduced and better technology and the crop loss which happened due to rain was compensated due to that increase.

Narnaund, Hansi, and Baas villages were reported to be the worst-hit due to rain and hailstorm.

NO BUFFER

Most farmers in Hisar are bringing their full produce to the market as the grain has lost its sheen and it would be costly and impractical for them to store the wheat at their own expense

Consider this, till May 5, all four procuring agencies had bought 4.58 lakh tonnes of wheat in the district compared to last year's May procurement of 4.63 lakh tonnes

There is an increase of almost 20% in crop yield due to new varieties getting introduced and better technology and the crop loss which happened due to rain was compensated due to that increase


With rain affecting grain quality, flour mills are purchasing wheat grain from states like Rajasthan and UP, leaving farmers here with no option than to sell everything to the government.

Surjeet Singh Beniwal, DM, Hafed

We have scientific methods to store the stock as it requires special treatment. Farmers lack access to these facilities and hence, they try and sell the wheat.

Ghanshyam Singh, district food and supplies controller