Health services affected as strike by rural medical officers enters ninth day | punjab | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 25, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Health services affected as strike by rural medical officers enters ninth day

Contrary to its claims of serving the rural people with commitment at the recently held zila parishad and panchayat elections, the SAD-BJP government has turned a blind eye to the problems faced by rural people in wake of the ongoing strike by rural medical officers (RMOs).

punjab Updated: Aug 10, 2013 00:24 IST

Contrary to its claims of serving the rural people with commitment at the recently held zila parishad and panchayat elections, the SAD-BJP government has turned a blind eye to the problems faced by rural people in wake of the ongoing strike by rural medical officers (RMOs).

Even after nine days of the strike, rural development and panchayats minister Surjit Singh Rakhra has failed to address the problem.

Working under the department of rural development and panchayats, around 1,200 RMOs have been demanding in-service quota for admission to the postgraduate courses.

In wake of the strike, people have been forced to go to private doctors which is taking a toll on their pockets.

Interestingly, deputy chief minister Sukhbir Singh Badal had recently announced Rs 10,000 crore for the development of villages while addressing the newly elected sarpanches.

Jagdish Sandhu, an NRI from the UK, who is visiting his native village Rurka Kalan, expressed shock at the state of affairsm, saying, "I was visiting my relatives in a nearby village and was shocked to know that they had been taking their son suffering from viral fever to a private doctor as the rural doctors were on strike."

Is health department justified?

The stand taken by the health department not to give PG quota to rural medical officers becomes questionable in wake of the "poor response" of specialists to join the health department.

Recently, the department had claimed that specialist doctors would be recruited directly from walk-in and campus interviews in state medical colleges but there are few takers. Out of nearly 400 posts advertised last month, only 112 came up for interview, and only 73 came to take the appointment letters.

Accusing the state government of making faulty policies, Dr Aslam Parvez, state president of Rural Medical Services Association, said the policy of directly recruiting specialists by ignoring rural doctors was myopic.