‘I won’t let a polar bear kill me,’ says photographer Mitul Dikshit

  • Harjeet Inder Singh Sahi, Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
  • Updated: Oct 17, 2015 13:07 IST
Mitul Dikshit, whose third solo photographic exhibition ‘Polar Expedition’ is on; likes to travel and capture ‘untouched’ places (Gurminder Singh/HT Photo)

With an unquenchable urge for travelling and capturing moments with his camera, Mitul Dikshit is often in a dilemma whether the happy moments recorded in memory are better than the captured ones. “This is a question I often ask myself. During the return from my expedition to Antarctica, I was in Buenos Aires and wanted to click more photographs but instead packed my bag. Sometimes, you have to draw the line,” says Mitul.

‘Polar Expedition’ is his third solo photographic exhibition. Earlier, he has hosted exhibitions on his work from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya.

Inspiration is not entirely an unconscious activity for Mitul. “Inspiration has both the elements of purpose and spur of the moment. In undertaking a difficult journey, you do have a purpose and the immediate capture happens because the scene simply dazzles you,” he says.

Mitul likes to visit pristine and unsullied places. Danger is ever present, as his preferred subject, the polar bear, is not known to be gentle and cuddly like the teddy bear. On being asked what will he do if a polar bear attacks him, he says, “I won’t let a polar bear kill me. These photographs are clicked from a safe distance. And you have to carry a gun.”

Polar bears are increasingly finding it difficult to survive as the ice in the Arctic is melting and the population of seals is dipping. “Sometimes bears float on ice in Scandinavian areas and reach coastal towns. Their habitat is shrinking and they find food with great difficulty,” says Mitul. Travelling is the best form of education. As he says, “I feel I only live for travelling. The best thing about travelling is getting to know new cultures and interacting with people.”

His nine-year-old son, Idant, accompanies him on photographic expeditions and has displayed 11 photographs at the exhibition.

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