Internet has reduced attention span of people: Rupa Bajwa | punjab | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 14, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Internet has reduced attention span of people: Rupa Bajwa

Internet and social networking sites have reduced attention span of people who read texts superficially, said writer Rupa Bajwa at Punjabi University on Tuesday.

punjab Updated: Feb 25, 2015 19:48 IST
HT Correspondent

Internet and social networking sites have reduced attention span of people who read texts superficially, said writer Rupa Bajwa at Punjabi University on Tuesday.

Bajwa was delivering the keynote address on "Literature in the Emerging Contexts of Technology and Culture" on the opening day of the two-day seminar organised by the Punjabi University's department of English.

Books are losing their importance, while reading e-books makes texts seem lifeless, she said, adding holding a book establishes a direct contact between the writer and the reader, and it adds soul to the text.

She said though technology has made a lot of material accessible to a larger number of people, its effects on human life remain ambivalent.

Bajwa concluded her address with an observation on the necessity of giving an independent voice to small-town writers "who should not lose their connections with their roots - what Tabish Khair terms 'small-town cosmopolitanism' -- and should not imitate the so-called cosmopolitan stalwarts".

In his presidential remarks, vice chancellor Jaspal Singh said literature and technology were two diverse subjects and might not have any connection, yet their relationship had long been associated with various advantages and disadvantages.

He said both must serve to provide a better coordination to the diverse forces of life.

The vice chancellor said he, as a traditional thinker, harboured apprehensions regarding the function of technology which had not been able to solve socio-economic problems like the divide between the rich and the poor.

This raised the question whether technology has been able to live up to the expectations of human being, Singh said.
Dr Rajesh Kumar Sharma, the head of department, focused on the digital turn that the history of technology has taken.
However, literature remains a recognisable figure amidst the technological milieu with its use of imagination, experience and thinking.

"We have moved ahead from the age of machine to the era of soft machine that is insidiously and overtly invading human life," he said.

Referring to the views of Heidegger on technology, he drew attention to the fact that giving space to technology has led to the human crisis of self-recognition.

Earlier Dr Rabinder Powar spoke on Bajwa's journey from a journalist to an award-winning novelist with her celebrated novels "The Sari Shop (2006) and Tell Me A Story (2011)".