Kitchen gardening seed sown in women's mind | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Kitchen gardening seed sown in women's mind

With a view to promoting the cultivation of vegetables and pulses to control the rising prices of these everyday consumer items, the state government has started educating women about kitchen gardening and its scope: this after a series of failed efforts to draw men who work on farms.

punjab Updated: Sep 18, 2012 19:49 IST
Surinder Maan

Women, in charge of running the kitchen, now have the power to control its budget even the times of food inflation.

With a view to promoting the cultivation of vegetables and pulses to control the rising prices of these everyday consumer items, the state government has started educating women about kitchen gardening and its scope: this after a series of failed efforts to draw men who work on farms.

On Saturday, the state agriculture department opened this special campaign in this district. At Dala village, it gave away the seeds of pulses, besides more than 100 bags of vegetable seeds and saplings to women free of cost. "The campaign will go to different villages," chief agriculture officer Harpreet Singh, who is also in charge of the agriculture technology management agency (ATMA), has said. "We want more women to join us."

Harbans Singh Johal, sarpanch of Dhalleke village, has seen women keen on adopting the idea. "Women are paying attention to it," he said. "It'll be good for middle-income farmers who are under the burden of price rise." Baldev Kaur of Sangatpura village has been growing cauliflower, lady's finger, mushroom, carrot and tomato in her kitchen garden for the past two years. "In the past two years, I have never bought vegetables for my house from the market," she said. "Now I even grow radish and spinach in my kitchen garden."

Devinder Singh Ghali, district president of the Kirti Kisan Union, has charged the state government with ignoring the demands of vegetable farmers. "Every season, farmers spend a lot of money on growing organic vegetables," he said, "but our financial position is getting weaker because of the government's apathy."

Vegetables grow on 23,743 acres in the four subdivisions (Moga, Baghapurana, Dharamkot and Nihal Singh Wala) of the district, chief agriculture officer Harpreet Singh has said. "Besides, another 62 acres are under tomato," he added. "It will increase in another three months."