Kitchlew Chowk flyover thrown open to public | punjab | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 13, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Kitchlew Chowk flyover thrown open to public

Punjab deputy chief minister Sukhbir Singh Badal on Sunday inaugurated the much-awaited Kitchlew Chowk flyover for the public after several hiccups and missed deadlines.

punjab Updated: Jan 12, 2014 20:48 IST
HT Correspondent

Punjab deputy chief minister Sukhbir Singh Badal on Sunday inaugurated the much-awaited Kitchlew Chowk flyover for the public after several hiccups and missed deadlines.


This is the fourth flyover that has come up in the city.

Constructed at the cost of more than Rs 20 crore, the overpass is around 900 meters long. It was mooted in September 2011 with the aim of decongesting the traffic around Kitchlew Chowk and providing a smooth route to commuters bound for the Sri Guru Ram Das Jee International Airport and areas along Ajnala Road.

The overpass, constructed at the busy Kitchlew Chowk crossing, is expected to rid the spot of frequent traffic snarls that were a norm here. Commuters pass through the intersection when on their way to the nearby district courts and Sri Guru Ram Das Jee International Airport and other offices.

The newly constructed bridge falls under the purview of the Amritsar Improvement Trust (AIT). SP Singla and Company was engaged in its construction with an initial deadline of 15 months to complete the project.
Various hurdles, including the scarcity of building material and objections raised by the forest department and environmental activists over the felling of trees, led to an inordinate delay in the completion of the project.

The torrential rain that lashed the city last year too contributed to the delay.

Those bound for the airport now would have to stop at one traffic light at the Queen's Road crossing while commuting between Taranwala Pul and Kitchlew Chowk flyover. The distance between Kitchlew Chowk and the international airport is around 16 kilometres.

The only traffic hurdles that commuters would have to face would be at Bhandari Bridge, the sole connecting link between the historic walled city area and the Civil Lines, which is in a bad shape.