Let us not be blind to our senses | punjab$htcity | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 15, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Let us not be blind to our senses

Recently, my wife and I were coming back from a late dinner. While negotiating a right turn at around 11.30pm, we came across a couple have difficulty crossing the road, with cars hardly giving them passage. We realised that the couple was blind and hence I stopped the car, blocking the traffic behind, finally helping them make their way.

punjab Updated: Aug 21, 2016 17:12 IST
“We came across a couple have difficulty crossing the road, with cars hardly giving them passage. We realised that the couple was blind and hence I stopped the car, blocking the traffic behind, finally helping them make their way.”
“We came across a couple have difficulty crossing the road, with cars hardly giving them passage. We realised that the couple was blind and hence I stopped the car, blocking the traffic behind, finally helping them make their way.”(Representative image )

Recently, my wife and I were coming back from a late dinner. While negotiating a right turn at around 11.30pm, we came across a couple have difficulty crossing the road, with cars hardly giving them passage. We realised that the couple was blind and hence I stopped the car, blocking the traffic behind, finally helping them make their way.

I asked them where they were headed to. They said it was to the local railway station, which was at least 3 kilometres away. I offered to drop them, to which they readily agreed and sat in the car’s rear seats.

My wife and I were startled as to how the couple in spite of being visually challenged were on the road on their own late in the night. I started conversing with them. They were husband and wife.

The husband’s name was Sunil and the wife’s was Suman. Sunil had lost his eyesight due to an injury on his head at the age of 12, while Suman lost her vision at eight owing to smallpox.

I asked them what were they doing late in the night to which they replied that they had gone to a temple since it was Tuesday. Be it day or night, it made no difference to them, they said.

As how they managed despite the handicap, Sunil said, “If you have five holes in a pipe and you are blowing air through it the air will come out of all five. And if you block one hole, then the air will continue to flow from the other four, except the intensity of the flow from the remaining four holes will increase to make up for the fifth one.”

At this, I felt certain positive energy for I could appreciate how Sunil and Suman’s attitude made all the difference in their lives.

Very often, we with all our five senses functioning don’t experience life much excitement that Sunil and Suman do. The reason: We have a negative energies inside. We are not challenged because of physical handicaps, but more because of mental ones. Meeting people such as Sunil and Suman and sharing a few moments with them is an amazing way to realise that attitude is everything.

Are we making the most of the five senses that most of us have. Let us see more of the good around us, listening to the good that is around, smell the good, taste the good and feel the good. This will come by constructing positive attitudes.

I remember a quote I often read when I was young. “I felt sad for I had no shoes till I came across a person who had no feet”.

I thank Sunil and Suman for making me realise that happiness is a direct function of how we use what we have and not how much we have. Let us strive to enjoy all what we have and strive to create more for the well-being of self and others.

(The writer is a Chandigarh-based freelance contributor)

mahavirindia@yahoo.com