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Ludhiana youth demands infrastructure

That city’s young brigade cares about politics was visible in the HT Young India Votes series interaction, where it expressed its expectations from the coming MP. Advanced infrastructure, employment, policy implementation and drugand-corruption-free society are on its wish list.

punjab Updated: Apr 13, 2014 10:19 IST

That city’s young brigade cares about politics was visible in the HT Young India Votes series interaction, where it expressed its expectations from the coming MP.


Advanced infrastructure, employment, policy implementation and drugand-corruption-free society are on its wish list. It doesn’t hold the 1984 or the 2002 riots in the memory but the reservation system has pinched it.

The youth yearn for good infrastructure in this industry-driven city. In policies to motivate small and medium entrepreneurs, the waiving of rent for initial six months and the optimal use of resources were the ideas they brought to the table.

Participant Mohinderpal Singh Bhatia called for stopping the flight of money to foreign countries. All rejected caste-based reservation but agreed on providing the needy with financial assistance. Priyanka Kumari was for equal education and opportunities to all but said: “Why reservation at the job level too. Let everyone compete equally.”

The young voter is concerned about women’s safety. “Why the 8pm curfew for girls?” said Kripa Seth. A change of mindset, the right deployment of police, and electronic surveillance were her solutions. Gurminder Pal suggested fighting the dowry system.

The young voter also sees a link between unemployment and drug menace. “When the education fails to ensure job, the youth go astray,” said Jagreet Singh. National-level basketball player Kirandeep Kaur and Ravinder Kaur said even athletes walked into the dark alley when they had no guidance.

NOT PARTY BUT CANDIDATE

It’s not the leaders’ words or parties but their deeds that would matter when the young voter decides. Coalition government, they say, is a better option than absolute majority in the hands of one group.

They see neither Modi wave not Rahul charm. Independent candidate Simarjit Singh Bains is their Robinhood figure but “good only for councillor’s job”. They’ll judge Aam Aadmi Party candidate HS Phoolka by his party’s quitting the responsibility to govern Delhi. Manpreet Singh said the AAP was too experienced to be given power.

In the city, the anti-incumbency factor should worry the Akalis more than the Congress, they said, not forgetting the contributions of Akali-BJP candidate Manpreet Ayali as zila parishad member, however.

Congress candidate Ravneet Bittu did a good job in Anandpur Sahib, they agree but can’t resist the urge to vote for change. The AAP is clean but an option for future. “It’s ditching Delhi made a bad impression,” said Munish Kumar, adding: “I want to give it time and hope it is ready in 2019.”


Ludhiana, HT Young India Votes, drug-and-corruption-free society, Rahul Gandhi, Narendra Modi, reservation system, industry-driven city, news, hindustantimesLudhiana youth demands infrastructure

Vandana Singh and Harshraj Singh
letterschd@hindustantimes.com

Ludhiana: That city’s young brigade cares about politics was visible in the HT Young India Votes series interaction, where it expressed its expectations from the coming MP.


Advanced infrastructure, employment, policy implementation and drugand-corruption-free society are on its wish list. It doesn’t hold the 1984 or the 2002 riots in the memory but the reservation system has pinched it.

The youth yearn for good infrastructure in this industry-driven city. In policies to motivate small and medium entrepreneurs, the waiving of rent for initial six months and the optimal use of resources were the ideas they brought to the table.

Participant Mohinderpal Singh Bhatia called for stopping the flight of money to foreign countries. All rejected caste-based reservation but agreed on providing the needy with financial assistance. Priyanka Kumari was for equal education and opportunities to all but said: “Why reservation at the job level too. Let everyone compete equally.”

The young voter is concerned about women’s safety. “Why the 8pm curfew for girls?” said Kripa Seth. A change of mindset, the right deployment of police, and electronic surveillance were her solutions. Gurminder Pal suggested fighting the dowry system.

The young voter also sees a link between unemployment and drug menace. “When the education fails to ensure job, the youth go astray,” said Jagreet Singh. National-level basketball player Kirandeep Kaur and Ravinder Kaur said even athletes walked into the dark alley when they had no guidance.

NOT PARTY BUT CANDIDATE

It’s not the leaders’ words or parties but their deeds that would matter when the young voter decides. Coalition government, they say, is a better option than absolute majority in the hands of one group.

They see neither Modi wave not Rahul charm. Independent candidate Simarjit Singh Bains is their Robinhood figure but “good only for councillor’s job”. They’ll judge Aam Aadmi Party candidate HS Phoolka by his party’s quitting the responsibility to govern Delhi. Manpreet Singh said the AAP was too experienced to be given power.

In the city, the anti-incumbency factor should worry the Akalis more than the Congress, they said, not forgetting the contributions of Akali-BJP candidate Manpreet Ayali as zila parishad member, however.

Congress candidate Ravneet Bittu did a good job in Anandpur Sahib, they agree but can’t resist the urge to vote for change. The AAP is clean but an option for future. “It’s ditching Delhi made a bad impression,” said Munish Kumar, adding: “I want to give it time and hope it is ready in 2019.”