Monsoon arrival in Chandigarh: Will Met get it right today? | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Monsoon arrival in Chandigarh: Will Met get it right today?

Earlier, the Met had said monsoon will reach Chandigarh and surrounding areas on June 28-29, then on July 4, before giving the revised date of July 7. But both the predictions went wrong.

punjab Updated: Jul 10, 2017 10:48 IST
Tanbir Dhaliwal
This is the third time since 1987 when monsoon has been delayed in Chandigarh.
This is the third time since 1987 when monsoon has been delayed in Chandigarh.(Karun Sharma/HT)

The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has predicted the monsoon to hit Chandigarh on July 10. But will the meteorological (Met) department get it right this time?

Earlier, the IMD had said monsoon will reach Chandigarh and surrounding areas on June 28-29, then on July 4, before giving the revised date of July 7. But both the predictions went wrong.

This is the third time since 1987 when monsoon has been delayed. In 1987, rains hit the region on July 27. In 2002 and 2004, the monsoon reached the city on July 4 and July 8.

“Monsoon advanced in most parts of Haryana by July 2 and it is likely to reach the city within 2-3 days, but due to changes in wind pattern, we could not see further monsoon advancement in the region,” said Surender Paul, director, IMD, Chandigarh.

He said the country has complex atmospheric system and there are numerous factors which affect monsoon.

“From Monday onwards, the weather will change. Sky will turn cloudy and there is a likelihood of rain as well. Most likely, monsoons will reach the city in the next 48-72 hours,” Surender Paul said.

Sultry weather conditions prevailed in the region on Sunday in the absence of any significant rainfall activity. Last year, the monsoon had entered the region July 2.

CAUSE OF WORRY

Delayed monsoon can also lead to rise in dengue cases, say experts.

Anti-malaria officer, Chandigarh, Gaurav Aggarwal said: “Intermittent rainfall is conducive for mosquito breeding. “Hence, we have to be more alert during such time period.”

Researchers have found that breeding of aedes aegypti (dengue causing mosquito) is not restricted to monsoon. Before rains, it breeds in water tanks, water containers and coolers, but as it starts raining, mosquitoes move out to the open spaces to breed. The dengue virus is not limited to any particular season, provided they get stagnant water, hot and humid weather.

However, no new dengue case has been reported this season. “No new dengue has been reported from the last three weeks. However, if monsoon gets delayed and city receives intermittent rains, dengue cases can come up,” he said.

However, the peak season is after the rains (September) as the virus needs time to complete its life cycle.

“It rained few days ago which has led to dampness in the air and has increased humidity. Such weather conditions are apt for mosquito breeding and might lead to increase in the number of dengue cases,” said Surender Paul.