Patients, doctors paying price for official apathy at Ghanupur Kale satellite hospital | punjab$amritsar | Hindustan Times
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Patients, doctors paying price for official apathy at Ghanupur Kale satellite hospital

Opened in 1999 to help people of Ghanupur Kale and its periphery avail themselves of better medical facilities, Bhai Himmat Singh Satellite Hospital is facing neglect.

punjab Updated: Aug 03, 2016 14:46 IST
Divya Sharma
Cracks in the wall of the ward at Bhai Himmat Singh Satellite Hospital in Ghanupur Kale village near Amritsar.
Cracks in the wall of the ward at Bhai Himmat Singh Satellite Hospital in Ghanupur Kale village near Amritsar.(Sameer Singh/HT Photo)

Opened in 1999 to help people of Ghanupur Kale and its periphery avail themselves of better medical facilities, Bhai Himmat Singh Satellite Hospital is facing neglect.

The hospital along with four other named after Panj Pyaras focus mainly on providing services to expecting mothers in peripheral areas of Amritsar. Pregnant women visiting the hospital, however, are far from happy.

“Look at the condition of this hospital. I am admitted here for delivery, and I need hygienic environment. What I am getting here is the opposite. Even toilets are not clean. I can catch any infection,” said Kanwaljit, an expecting mother, who came to the hospital from Chheharta.

Broken urinals at Bhai Himmat Singh Satellite Hospital in Ghanupur Kale village (Sameer Sehgal/HT Photo)

Around 60 patients visit the outpatient department (OPD) of the hospital every day. There are also two dispensaries running on the hospital premises, one under the civil surgeon and the other being run by the Employees’ State Insurance Corporation (ESIC).

Wild growth, algae and mosquito larvae thriving in stagnant water surrounding the hospital. (Sameer Sehgal/HT Photo)

After having a tough time commuting on the dilapidated road that leads to this hospital, the patients, most of whom are pregnant women, visiting the OPD and dispensaries are welcomed by stagnant water surrounding the premises and pungent smell.

A PLETHORA OF PROBLEMS

There are seven rooms, including a ward, in this sixbedded hospital. The room has six fans, of which three were not working when HT visited the hospital.

Neema, a visitor, said: “The fans are not working. We expect better facilities at such a hospital.” Manjit Kaur, a patient’s attendant, said: “Bed sheets are dirty. We have been told to get our own bed sheets from home.”

With the passage of time, the government has failed to update facilities at the hospital and even its building is considered to be unsafe. Cracks have appeared on the walls, and due to overflowing sewage, the building has been damaged.

Sukhjinder Singh, a resident, said, “The hospital is in a poor state. But we can’t be running to the city for all health issues.”

A doctor on duty, on the condition of anonymity, said: “Patients have to face a lot of problems. Also, the building is not safe. We have written a number of times to the authorities concerned. They just keep passing the buck.”

The hospital keeps receiving pregnancy cases at odd hours. The nursing staff present at night feel unsafe in absence of any security guard.

Recently, deputy commissioner Varun Roojam, civil surgeon Dr Pradeep Chawla and municipal commissioner Sonali Giri visited the hospital and assured help, but nothing has happened yet.