Pirated CDs' market thrives under the nose of cops | punjab | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 20, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Pirated CDs' market thrives under the nose of cops

While there are many struggling to get a ticket for their favourite actors' movie every Friday, there are others who can easily lay hands on the latest movies, thanks to the pirated CDs circulating in the city.

punjab Updated: Sep 20, 2014 08:15 IST
Sukhpreet Singh

While there are many struggling to get a ticket for their favourite actors' movie every Friday, there are others who can easily lay hands on the latest movies, thanks to the pirated CDs circulating in the city.

Besides, computer software and games that would otherwise run into thousands can be effortlessly obtained for a few hundred rupees. Thanks to the police turning a blind eye to the menace.
Even as the areas where these pirated CDs can be obtained easily are widely known, police have failed to act.

While a movie ticket in a multiplex can cost a viewer up to Rs 200, the price of movie CDs is Rs 30 to 40 in the market, while the vendors get them for Rs 15. As a result, residents don't seem to complain. These pirated CDs are not only bought by residents for private viewing, they are also screened in hotels, clubs, luxury buses, restaurants, etc.

The Indian Copyright Act, 1957, prohibits copying a film on any medium by any means and allows violators to be punished with imprisonment for a term which will not be less than six months but can extend to three years and with a fine up to Rs 2 lakh rupees.

However, oblivious to the law, vendors brazenly continue to sell pirated CDs of movies, MP3 songs, computer games and software in public.

Hawkers can be seen shouting "Mary Kom…Mary Kom!!" to entice passers-by to get a quick, easy and cheap copy of the movie and several others in different areas, including Bhadaur House, Gur Mandi, Mata Rani Chowk, Salem Tabri and near railway station.

According to sources, these CDs are normally collected from Bhadaur House, where these vendors outnumber even fruit and vegetable vendors, and then salesmen distribute them among different hawkers across the city.

The widespread piracy causes the movie industry losses running into thousands of crores, with several cinema halls facing dwindling audience, as people prefer watching the movie for lower prices in the comfort of their homes.

Rajesh Raj, owner at Music City at Kipps Market, Sarabha Nagar, said, "Pirated CDs have caused a huge dent in our business, as the original CDs cost more than Rs 200, while the pirated ones are available for very low prices. Police need to act to curtail this."

Police commissioner Pramod Ban said, "I will look into the matter and take action."