Proceedings starts to bring back 'Babbar Khalsa militant' from US | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Proceedings starts to bring back 'Babbar Khalsa militant' from US

After bringing back Jaskaran Singh Kalsi alias Jassa, an accused in the Yannick murder case, from Australia this week, the Jalandhar commissionerate police have initiated proceedings for extradition of alleged Babbar Khalsa International (BKI) terrorist, Balwinder Singh Possi.

punjab Updated: Sep 19, 2014 19:57 IST
Jatinder Kohli

After bringing back Jaskaran Singh Kalsi alias Jassa, an accused in the Yannick murder case, from Australia this week, the Jalandhar commissionerate police have initiated proceedings for extradition of alleged Babbar Khalsa International (BKI) terrorist, Balwinder Singh Possi.


Possi is wanted for the twin blasts at Jalandhar's inter-state roadways bus stand in 2006.
For the purpose, additional deputy commissioner of police (crime) J Elanchezhian, left for New Delhi on Thursday night along with officials of the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) to attend a video conference with the US Justice department.

In the high-level meeting, three separate cases of extradition were to be talked over, including that of Possi.

The talks from India were to be moderated by CBI officials along with J. Elanchezhian who went with documents of cases registered against Possi at police division-7 in June 2006.

As per information available, Possi was detained by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) a year ago in America on charges of using fraudulent documents for permanent residency of USA, forging immigration documents, making false statements on an immigration document and allegedly providing material support to militants.

Possi was booked by Jalandhar police in two bomb blast cases. The first blast occurred in a passenger bus on April 28, 2006. Three people were killed and at least 10 sustained serious injuries in the incident. The Punjab roadways bus, in which more than 50 people were travelling, was to leave for Una in Himachal Pradesh when the explosion occurred at about 4.00 pm.

The second blast on May 24, 2006, failed to cause much loss as it was near a garbage heap. An empty bus caught fire in the incident but no casualties were reported.

In June 2006, police had arrested Satnam Singh Satta, claiming he had planted the bombs after explosive materials were recovered from his home. Police had claimed that Satta carried out the blasts on the instructions of Pakistan-based Khalistan Zindabad Force chief Ranjit Singh Neeta.

Satta was later acquitted in January 2009 after police failed to prove his role and did not file an appeal against his acquittal.

Confirming the development, deputy commissioner of police Naveen Singla said police had started proceedings for the extradition of Possi for which ADCP (crime) had gone to New Delhi for a high-level meeting with US justice department through video conferencing to discuss the case.


Singh said Possi had been detained for the past one year and the US government wanted to extradite him.

The Punjab police had arrested Possi's widowed mother Salinder Kaur and sister Kulwinder Kaur in March 2013 and recovered sophisticated weapons including a 7.65mm auto pistol, a 0.9 mm US-made pistol, a .30 bore mouser, a .32 bore revolver, two country-made pistols, three magazines and live cartridges from their house. Both are now out on bail. They were booked by the Garhshankar police under the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA), 1967, and Arms Act for being part of the terror module and handling its funds.

Later, Kulwinder's son Daljit Singh, who was also named in the FIR, was arrested from Delhi airport on his return from Malaysia.